•  
  •  
 

Guidelines for Articles & Reviews

Article Guidelines for Authors

Download a PDF document of the Article Guidelines for Authors here.

Thank you for considering Andrews University Seminary Studies (AUSS) as a potential publishing outlet for your article. Before submitting it, however, please take a few moments to review the following submission guidelines. Articles that do not conform to these guidelines will be returned to the author for corrections. AUSS strives for the highest quality in publishing content. Therefore, an article must represent an original and previously unpublished study, must not have been submitted to other journals concurrently with the submission to AUSS, and must be in what the author intends as its final form.

Topics Accepted for Publishing

AUSS publishes research articles on the following topics: biblical archaeology and history of antiquity; Hebrew Bible and New Testament studies; church history of all periods; historical, biblical, systematic, and philosophical theology; science and religion; ethics; world religions; and missiology. Occasionally, selected research articles on ministry and Christian education may also be published (it is recommended that authors query the editors before submitting on these topics).

Focus of Published Works

AUSS accepts articles written by authors of different faith persuasions. However, the focus of the journal, as that of the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, where AUSS is based, is biblical. A high regard for Scripture, along with elevated standards of research, characterizes the choice of articles.

Language Requirements

AUSS accepts articles written in the scholarly languages of English, French, and German. Articles submitted to AUSS in English must conform to acceptable English language standards. American spelling and punctuation will be used in editing. Authors are asked to use gender-inclusive language, such as “humanity” rather than “mankind” and “person” or “human being” rather than “man.”

Preferred Length

AUSS prefers articles with 5,000–10,000 words, including footnotes. Longer articles may occasionally be accepted, if they are particularly significant and space is available in the journal (it is recommended that authors query the editors for such articles). When the editors deem that an article needs to be substantially shortened, they will return the manuscript to the author with instructions regarding the areas needing attention.

Style Manual

For style matters and scholarly abbreviations, AUSS uses Patrick H. Alexander et al., eds., The SBL Handbook of Style: For Biblical Studies and Related Disciplines, 2nd ed. (Atlanta: SBL Press, 2014). For cases of ambiguity or those not covered in SBL Handbook of Style, follow University of Chicago, The Chicago Manual of Style: The Essential Guide for Writers, Editors, and Publishers, 16th ed. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010) and Kate L. Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations: Chicago Style for Students and Researchers, 8th ed., rev. Wayne C. Booth et al. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013). For spelling, authors may refer to Philip Babcock Gove, ed., Webster’s Third New International Dictionary of the English Language Unabridged (Springfield, MA: Merriam-Webster, 2002).

Style and Formatting

Manuscripts for articles should be double-spaced (except footnotes and indented quotations), have one-inch margins, and be left-justified. Excessive formatting should be avoided, with only block quotations, tables, figures, headings, and subheadings included. Tabs should be used rather than single spacing or first-line indentation. Sentences should have only a single space between them. Tables should be formed using standardized table templates provided in the author’s word-processing software. The motto for formatting is, “Keep it simple!” Please note the formatting techniques that follow.

Quotations

Quotations longer than five lines are to be indented and single-spaced. Spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and abbreviations must be reproduced exactly as in the original and care should be taken to preserve the original author’s intent. When making omissions in quotations, the use of ellipses should follow SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed., 4.1.3. However, the format of the ellipses themselves should not follow the handbook but instead include one space before and after each period (e.g., . . . , rather than ... ). A space should also be placed between ellipses and original punctuation. Ellipses normally should not be used at the beginning or end of a quotation.

Citations and Abbreviations

Citations and abbreviations for all biblical, classical, and patristic literature, Dead Sea Scrolls and related texts, Targumic material, Mishnaic and Rabbinic literature, Nag Hammadi Tractates, and journals, periodicals, and major reference works should follow SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed., 8.2–8.4.
          For biblical references, no period is used following the abbreviations; a colon is used between chapter and verse. Biblical references should be placed in parentheses in the text of the article, rather than in footnotes (see SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed.). Citations of classical and patristic literature should follow SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed.
          The following abbreviations should be used in parenthetical or footnote references. The terms should be spelled out when they occur in the text.

ch(s). chapter(s) col(s). column(s)
v(v). verse(s) frag(s). fragment(s)
n(n). note(s) pl(s). plate(s)

Footnotes

For footnote formatting techniques, see SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed., 7.1–7.4. Ordinal numbers used for sources with more than one edition, reprints, etc. should not have superscripted letters (e.g., 2nd ed., rather than 2nd ed.; see SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed., 8.4). Page numbers included in footnotes should be all-inclusive (e.g., 110–111; 234–239 rather than 110–11; 234–39) and should not include the abbreviation p(p). before them.
          When a note of comment includes a bibliographical reference, this reference should be set in parentheses at the end of the comment. When parentheses are needed within parentheses, brackets should be used. For instance: “But C. C. Torrey thinks that the name Cyrus has been interpolated in Isa 45:1” (“The Messiah Son of Ephraim,” JBL 66 [1947]: 253).

Biblical Languages

Greek and Hebrew fonts are generally preferred rather than transliteration. Transliteration should be used primarily for ancient nonbiblical languages. Due to the problem of font compatibility, AUSS accepts only unicode fonts. Before submitting Greek and Hebrew in other fonts or transliterations, please query the editors for directions.

Dates

The format of dates in footnotes should follow the day-month-year system with the name of the month spelled out (e.g., 23 September 2016; see SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed., 4.3.7.1). Inclusive dates should use all digits for all years (e.g., 1857–1868, rather than 1857–68; see SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed., 4.2.5). Abbreviations for chronological eras should follow SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed., 8.1.2 (e.g., 457 BC or AD 325).

Hyphens and Dashes

SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed., 2.1.3.4, should be followed when using hyphens and dashes. Hyphens (-) are generally used to form certain compound terms, especially compound adjectives. En dashes (–) should be used when representing a span or range of numbers (i.e., page numbers [e.g., 36–42] or textual references [e.g., John 1:1–3]) and dates (e.g., 1963–2016) and also can be used between words to represent conflict, connection, or direction (e.g., “liberal–conservative debate”). Em dashes (—) can be used for phrases or clauses that interrupt the flow of a sentence and are normally set apart by commas, parentheses, or colons. Spaces should not be placed between the hyphen or dash and the words or numbers that they connect.

Numbers

When used in nontechnical contexts, whole numbers zero through one hundred and ordinal numbers that are used in sentences should be spelled out and follow SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed., 4.2.1–4.2.2. Arabic numbers (1, 10) are preferred over roman numerals (I, X). For exceptions, see SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed., 4.2.2.

Abstract

After the title, the article should include an abstract of 150–200 words that succinctly summarizes the content of the article by identifying the research issue(s) being addressed, the methodology employed, the research results and findings, and the main conclusions and recommendations. The thesis of the article should be clearly stated in the abstract. At the end of the abstract three to five keywords should be listed for search purposes.

Submission

Articles may be submitted by uploading them onto the submission webpage (Submit Manuscript). The Submit Manuscript link in the sidebar directs to the submission webpage. Please note that you will be prompted to create an online account (e-mail address and password) with AUSS, if you do not have one already. AUSS will accept articles prepared in Microsoft Word. Tables, charts, or diagrams should be reproducible in Microsoft Word. Photographs should be black and white with strong contrast and high resolution. They can be submitted by uploading them in JPEG format onto the submission webpage on the AUSS website after the article has been submitted.

Referee Process

AUSS is a refereed journal. After submission, each article is read by at least two, and often three, scholars who are competent in the area(s) treated in the article. To maintain objectivity, the name(s) of the author(s) should not appear on the submitted manuscript, and the instructions in the “Ensuring a Blind Referee Process” section below should be followed carefully because this will be the manuscript that is sent to the referees. AUSS editors will refer helpful referee comments to the author to facilitate the process of any necessary rewriting. After revising the manuscript, the author may resubmit the article. Revised manuscripts should be accompanied by a cover letter detailing the changes requested and the action taken (or the author’s argument for retaining the original text). A final decision on whether or not the article will be published in AUSS is made by the editors.

Ensuring a Blind Referee Process

To ensure the integrity of the blind referee process for submission to this journal, every effort should be made to prevent the identities of the authors and referees from being known to each other. This involves the authors, editors, and referees (who upload documents as part of their refereeing) checking to see if the following steps have been taken with regard to the text and the file properties:

  • The authors of the document have deleted their names from the text, with “Author” and year used in the references and footnotes, instead of the authors’ name, article title, etc.
  • With Microsoft Word documents, author identification should also be removed from the properties of the file (see the Microsoft Office website for specific instructions on how to do this in your version of Microsoft Word).

Editorial Modification and Copyright

AUSS reserves the right to make necessary modifications to articles that have been submitted in order to comply with the journal’s content and style. After the referee process, authors of articles edited for publication will receive an electronic copy (PDF) in pages, as it is intended to be published. Authors will carefully review the article and provide a prompt formal response accepting it “as-is” or detailing any necessary changes and corrections (making sure to reference a page, line, and/or footnote number for each change). Authors will also be asked to sign the accompanying copyright release form.

Publication Follow-up

Following the publication of an article, AUSS sends an electronic copy (PDF) of it in pages and two complimentary copies of the AUSS issue in which the article appears to the author(s).

Submission Preparation Checklist for Articles

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission’s compliance with all of the following items. Submissions that do not adhere to these guidelines may be returned to the authors.

  • The submission has not been previously published and is not before another journal for consideration.
  • The submission is in Microsoft Word format.
  • The text is doubled-spaced; single-spaced between sentences; uses a 12-point font; employs italics, rather than underlining; and all illustrations, figures, and tables are placed within the text at the appropriate points, rather than at the end.
  • The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the “Style and Formatting” section.
  • The instructions in the “Ensuring a Blind Referee Process” section were followed.

{ top }

Book Review Guidelines for Reviewers

Download a PDF document of the Book Review Guidelines for Reviewers here.

Thank you for considering Andrews University Seminary Studies (AUSS) as a potential publishing outlet for your book review. AUSS strives for the highest quality in publishing content. Therefore, please take a few moments to review the following publishing guidelines. Book reviews that do not conform to these guidelines will be returned to the reviewer for corrections. Books received in the areas of AUSS interest (see masthead) may be assigned for review by the editorial team. Interested persons may contact the Book Review Manager to request or recommend books for review.

Content and Method

A book review should summarize the main content of the book and provide a critique, the latter usually being given the larger amount of space. Brief reference to the author’s background and qualifications is also useful.
          The review should be evaluative. It may compare the book with others of similar topic, as well as with other books written by the author. Footnotes are not to be used; any needed references are to be incorporated into the text in parentheses and should not include the abbreviation p(p). before it. Reviews must maintain courteous language, free from invectives of any kind. The basic outline for a review should contain the following sections: introduction, evaluation, and conclusion.
          The introduction should begin with a full bibliographical reference. Author (last name first). Title. Place of publication: Publisher, Date of publication. Number of pages (Roman numerals + arabic numerals). Hard (or soft) cover. Price. Identify the author, and place both the author and the title in the context of earlier works in the same field of study. State the author’s main argument briefly in very specific terms.
          In the evaluation section, describe and evaluate the sources from which the author derived his/her information (primary or secondary, many or few). Then evaluate the development of the author’s argument. How well does the author succeed in carrying out the stated purpose of the book? List and comment on the book’s strengths and weaknesses.
          The conclusion should give your judgment on the general value of the book and the type of reader who will likely find it useful.
          Book reviews of symposia, Festschriften, and collected essays can be treated within the prescribed length limits by listing the titles of the articles and selecting for special treatment a few articles in which the reviewer is specifically interested or that fall into the specialty area of his/her expertise.

Preferred Length

AUSS prefers book reviews with 800–1,500 words. No more than half of the review should be used to describe the contents of the book; the rest should be used for evaluation and comment. Reviewers should use precise language, clear syntax, and avoid unreasonably long and complex sentences.

Style Manual

For style matters and scholarly abbreviations, AUSS uses Patrick H. Alexander et al., eds., The SBL Handbook of Style: For Biblical Studies and Related Disciplines, 2nd ed. (Atlanta: SBL Press, 2014). For cases of ambiguity or those not covered in SBL Handbook of Style, follow University of Chicago, The Chicago Manual of Style: The Essential Guide for Writers, Editors, and Publishers, 16th ed. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010) and Kate L. Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations: Chicago Style for Students and Researchers, 8th ed., rev. Wayne C. Booth et al. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013). For spelling, authors may refer to Philip Babcock Gove, ed., Webster’s Third New International Dictionary of the English Language Unabridged (Springfield, MA: Merriam-Webster, 2002).

Style and Formatting

Manuscripts for book reviews should be double-spaced, have one-inch margins, and be left-justified. Excessive formatting should be avoided, with only block quotations, tables, figures, headings, and subheadings included. Tabs should be used rather than single spacing or first-line indentation. Sentences should have only a single space between them. Tables should be formed using standardized table templates provided in the author’s word-processing software. The motto for formatting is, “Keep it simple!” Please note the formatting techniques that follow.

Quotations

Quotations longer than five lines are to be indented and single-spaced. Spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and abbreviations must be reproduced exactly as in the original and care should be taken to preserve the original author’s intent. When making omissions in quotations, the use of ellipses should follow SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed., 4.1.3. However, the format of the ellipses themselves should not follow the handbook but instead include one space before and after each period (e.g., . . . , rather than ... ). A space should also be placed between ellipses and original punctuation. Ellipses normally should not be used at the beginning or end of a quotation.

Citations and Abbreviations

Citations and abbreviations for all biblical, classical, and patristic literature, Dead Sea Scrolls and related texts, Targumic material, Mishnaic and Rabbinic literature, Nag Hammadi Tractates, and journals, periodicals, and major reference works should follow SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed., 8.2–8.4.
          For biblical references, no period is used following the abbreviations; a colon is used between chapter and verse. Biblical references should be placed in parentheses in the text of the article, rather than in footnotes (see SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed.). Citations of classical and patristic literature should follow SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed.
          The following abbreviations should be used in parenthetical or footnote references. The terms should be spelled out when they occur in the text.

ch(s). chapter(s) col(s). column(s)
v(v). verse(s) frag(s). fragment(s)
n(n). note(s) pl(s). plate(s)

Biblical Languages

Greek and Hebrew fonts are generally preferred rather than transliteration. Transliteration should be used primarily for ancient nonbiblical languages. Due to the problem of font compatibility, AUSS accepts only unicode fonts. Before submitting Greek and Hebrew in other fonts or transliterations, please query the editors for directions.

Dates

The format of dates in footnotes should follow the day-month-year system with the name of the month spelled out (e.g., 23 September 2016; see SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed., 4.3.7.1). Inclusive dates should use all digits for all years (e.g., 1857–1868, rather than 1857–68; see SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed., 4.2.5). Abbreviations for chronological eras should follow SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed., 8.1.2 (e.g., 457 BC or AD 325).

Hyphens and Dashes

SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed., 2.1.3.4, should be followed when using hyphens and dashes. Hyphens (-) are generally used to form certain compound terms, especially compound adjectives. En dashes (–) should be used when representing a span or range of numbers (i.e., page numbers [e.g., 36–42] or textual references [e.g., John 1:1–3]) and dates (e.g., 1963–2016) and also can be used between words to represent conflict, connection, or direction (e.g., “liberal–conservative debate”). Em dashes (—) can be used for phrases or clauses that interrupt the flow of a sentence and are normally set apart by commas, parentheses, or colons. Spaces should not be placed between the hyphen or dash and the words or numbers that they connect.

Numbers

When used in nontechnical contexts, whole numbers zero through one hundred and ordinal numbers that are used in sentences should be spelled out and follow SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed., 4.2.1–4.2.2. Ordinal numbers that are used in citations of sources with more than one edition, reprints, etc. should not have superscripted letters (e.g., 2nd ed., rather than 2nd ed.; see SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed., 8.4). Arabic numbers (1, 10) are preferred over Roman numerals (I, X). For exceptions, see SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed., 4.2.2. Number ranges should be all-inclusive (e.g., 234–239; 1964–1967, rather than 234–39; 1964–67).

Submission

After the reviewer has agreed to review a book, the book review should be submitted within three months. Book reviews should be prepared in Microsoft Word and may be submitted by uploading them onto the submission webpage on the AUSS website (Submit Manuscript). The “Submit Manuscript” link in the sidebar directs to the submission webpage. Please note that you will be prompted to create an online account (e-mail address and password) with AUSS, if you do not have one already.

Editorial Modification

AUSS reserves the right to make necessary modifications to book reviews that have been submitted in order to comply with the journal’s content and style. Reviewers of book reviews edited for publication will receive an electronic copy (PDF) in pages, as it is intended to be published. Reviewers will carefully read the book review and provide a prompt formal response accepting it "as-is" or detailing any necessary changes and corrections (making sure to reference a page and line number for each change).

Publication Follow-up

Following the publication of a book review, AUSS sends electronic copies (PDF) to the reviewer and to the publisher of the book.

Submission Preparation Checklist for Book Reviews

As part of the submission process, reviewers are required to check off their submission’s compliance with all of the following items. Submissions that do not adhere to these guidelines may be returned to the reviewers.

  • The submission is in Microsoft Word format.
  • The text is doubled-spaced; single-spaced between sentences; uses a 12-point font; and employs italics, rather than underlining.
  • The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the “Book Review Guidelines” section.

{ top }