Title

Impact of Parents and Teachers on School Bullying among Elementary and Middle School Girls

Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Publication Date

11-3-2015

Abstract

Bullying is a widespread problem among school-aged girls. Researchers have found that around one-fourth of middle school girls said they were bullied, with a similar rate admitting to bullying others in the past year.

Survey data were collected in spring 2013 on 708 elementary and middle school girls across 28 schools in Berrien County, Michigan who participated in an afterschool fitness and character building program.

Frequencies showed that 39.3% of all girls admitted to bullying others by saying mean things, teasing or calling names to other students in the previous year. Elementary school girls (N=358) who believed they had teachers and other grownups at school who cared about them, listened to them, or believed they could do a good job were significantly more likely to not engage in bullying behaviors (OR=1.86, OR=1.87, and OR=1.77, respectively). In addition, elementary school girls who believed they had parents or other grownups at home who listened when they had something to say were significantly more likely not to bully others (OR=1.80). Further analyses will focus on differences between elementary and middle school girls and by ethnic group.

Elementary school girls who have supportive teachers and parents are significantly more likely not to bully others. Strengthening bonds and improving positive communication between girls and their parents and teachers may result in decreased bullying behaviors.

Comments

American Public Health Association. Annual Meeting

October 31 - November 04, 2015; Chicago, Illinois

City

Chicago, IL

Series

American Public Health Association. Annual Meeting

Edition

2015

First Department

Social Work

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