Title

Immigration and HIV among Migrant Workers in Rural Southern Florida

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-1-1997

Abstract

We studied HIV seropositivity among a targeted sample of migrant workers who used drugs, primarily crack cocaine, and their sexual partners in rural southern Florida from 1993 to 1995. We enrolled men and women who were born in the United States (n=369) or in other countries (n=174). Overall, 11.2% of the sample were HIV positive, including 18% of Blacks from the United States, and about 8% of non-Hispanic whites from the United States, Blacks from the Caribbean, and persons from Central or South America. No Hispanics from the United States or the Caribbean, but 3.4% of Hispanics from Mexico, were HIV positive. In logistic regression analyses, race/ethnicity, gender, and age were moot highly associated with HIV seropositivity. Immigration status, current drug use, and current sexual activity were not related to HIV seropositivity. HIV prevention programs must help reduce heterosexual transmission of HIV associated with drug use both locally and where migrants travel and work.

Journal Title

Journal of Drug Issues

Volume

27

Issue

1

First Page

155

Last Page

172

DOI

10.1177/002204269702700111

First Department

Behavioral Sciences

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