Date of Award

4-4-2019

Document Type

Honors Thesis

Department

Behavioral Sciences

First Advisor

Duane McBride

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between postpartum depression and mother-child bonding. The purpose of this study is to help improve the understanding of the bond between a mother and child and the factors that affect postpartum depression. The dependent variable is bonding, it described as the emotional attachment between mother and child. Bonding is measured using the Post Partum Bonding Scale. The independent variable is postpartum depression. This is a disease that arises after birth often affecting the way a woman connects with the world around her. This variable is studied using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. A series of several demographic questions are used to understand the factors that affect postpartum depression. The sample population consists of 84 individuals 18 years and older who have given birth in the last 6 months . Data was collected through an online survey platform and through two state health centers. My hypothesis is that the higher the presence of postpartum depression the weaker the bond between a mother and her infant. It is also hypothesized that mothers with disadvantageous demographics, such as lower socioeconomic status and minority groups, will display a higher risk for postpartum depression. Significance of my results is determined based on a Person's r and a Chi square test, measured based on a .05 alpha with a medium effect size. The findings of the research mostly support my hypotheses. The research analysis showed a positive correlation between the two variables, as one's likelihood for PPD increases, so does the likelihood for mother child bonding disorders. In addition, when from a disadvantaged group, mothers score higher on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale.

Subject Area

Mother and infant; Postpartum depression

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

DOI

https://dx.doi.org/10.32597/honors/203

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