Location

Buller Hallway

Start Date

3-6-2015 2:30 PM

End Date

3-6-2015 4:00 PM

Description

Cannibalism leads to a variety of behavioral and demographic consequences among numerous taxa. Although multiple studies have linked cannibalism to egg and chick failure in gull populations, few characterizations of gull cannibal behavior exist. During the 2014 breeding season, we observed territories of 16 Glaucous-winged Gull (Larus glaucescens) egg cannibal specialists on Protection Island, Washington, USA. We also monitored cannibal foraging behavior, reproductive success, and colony-wide egg loss. Cannibals employed a variety of foraging behaviors and exhibited significantly lower reproductive success than non-cannibals. Future study of the Protection Island gull colony will monitor trends in cannibalism relative to environmental change.

Acknowledgments

J.N. Andrews Honors Scholar

Advisors: James Hayward, Biology and Shandelle Henson, Mathematics

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Mar 6th, 2:30 PM Mar 6th, 4:00 PM

P-19 The Behavior of Glaucous-winged Gull Egg Cannibals

Buller Hallway

Cannibalism leads to a variety of behavioral and demographic consequences among numerous taxa. Although multiple studies have linked cannibalism to egg and chick failure in gull populations, few characterizations of gull cannibal behavior exist. During the 2014 breeding season, we observed territories of 16 Glaucous-winged Gull (Larus glaucescens) egg cannibal specialists on Protection Island, Washington, USA. We also monitored cannibal foraging behavior, reproductive success, and colony-wide egg loss. Cannibals employed a variety of foraging behaviors and exhibited significantly lower reproductive success than non-cannibals. Future study of the Protection Island gull colony will monitor trends in cannibalism relative to environmental change.