Event Title

The Scope of Salvation in Romans 8:19–23: Does God Deliver All of His Creation?

Location

Seminary Commons

Start Date

7-2-2020 12:00 PM

End Date

7-2-2020 1:00 AM

Description

Paul describes all creation (Romans 8:22) as eagerly waiting for God’s revelation, subject to futility in hope of deliverance, and groaning with those who have God’s Spirit (8:19-23). Some scholars propose that in this text Paul personifies all of sub-human creation to dramatize the extent of the effects of sin and salvation. They support this as follows. (1) God does not subject sinless angels to results of sin and salvation. (2) Not every angel and human waits eagerly for God’s revelation. (3) The Greek text presents contrast without continuity between creation and those who have the Spirit (8:22–23). Alternatively, I propose that Paul personifies the whole of angelic, human, and sub-human creation to dramatize the extent of the effects of sin and salvation. I support this as follows. (1) Paul uses double entendre to describe all Israel (9:6; 11:26), humanity (5:12, 18) and creation (8:22), using the word all to identify the whole as well as a part of each. (2) Sinless angels are subject to some results of sin and salvation. (3) The creation as a whole waits eagerly for God’s revelation. (4) The Greek text presents contrast with continuity between the creation and those who have the Spirit (8:22–23).

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Feb 7th, 12:00 PM Feb 7th, 1:00 AM

The Scope of Salvation in Romans 8:19–23: Does God Deliver All of His Creation?

Seminary Commons

Paul describes all creation (Romans 8:22) as eagerly waiting for God’s revelation, subject to futility in hope of deliverance, and groaning with those who have God’s Spirit (8:19-23). Some scholars propose that in this text Paul personifies all of sub-human creation to dramatize the extent of the effects of sin and salvation. They support this as follows. (1) God does not subject sinless angels to results of sin and salvation. (2) Not every angel and human waits eagerly for God’s revelation. (3) The Greek text presents contrast without continuity between creation and those who have the Spirit (8:22–23). Alternatively, I propose that Paul personifies the whole of angelic, human, and sub-human creation to dramatize the extent of the effects of sin and salvation. I support this as follows. (1) Paul uses double entendre to describe all Israel (9:6; 11:26), humanity (5:12, 18) and creation (8:22), using the word all to identify the whole as well as a part of each. (2) Sinless angels are subject to some results of sin and salvation. (3) The creation as a whole waits eagerly for God’s revelation. (4) The Greek text presents contrast with continuity between the creation and those who have the Spirit (8:22–23).