Event Title

Adverse Childhood Experiences: Their Impact on Pastoral Ministry

Location

Room N335

Start Date

7-2-2020 11:30 AM

End Date

7-2-2020 12:00 PM

Description

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) have been shown to have deleterious effects on the physical, emotional and behavioral health of those exposed to them. Dr. Vincent Felitti was the director of a successful weight-loss clinic run by Kaiser Permanente Hospital in San Diego, CA. Patients lost weight successfully, but upon six-month follow up interviews, had regained the weight. Dr. Felitti reported that childhood sexual abuse was one factor he uncovered in these interviews. This changed his approach in that he began to see weight gain as a symptom rather than the problem. In conjunction with the Center for Disease Control, he conducted the original ACE study.

This study has been replicated many times over with similar results. This study has become the foundation for the creation of best-practices in many areas related to trauma and the long-term health, emotional and behavioral negative effects of trauma on survivors.

Seventh-day Adventist pastors are subjected to multiple stressors in the daily routine of pastoral life. These stressors have a negative impact on the spiritual lives, relationships, health behaviors and mental health of not only pastors but their entire families. A pilot study was done of incoming seminary students in the fall semester of 2019 using an expanded ACE questionnaire. This presentation will share the results of that study and its implications for seminary students and pastors.

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Feb 7th, 11:30 AM Feb 7th, 12:00 PM

Adverse Childhood Experiences: Their Impact on Pastoral Ministry

Room N335

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) have been shown to have deleterious effects on the physical, emotional and behavioral health of those exposed to them. Dr. Vincent Felitti was the director of a successful weight-loss clinic run by Kaiser Permanente Hospital in San Diego, CA. Patients lost weight successfully, but upon six-month follow up interviews, had regained the weight. Dr. Felitti reported that childhood sexual abuse was one factor he uncovered in these interviews. This changed his approach in that he began to see weight gain as a symptom rather than the problem. In conjunction with the Center for Disease Control, he conducted the original ACE study.

This study has been replicated many times over with similar results. This study has become the foundation for the creation of best-practices in many areas related to trauma and the long-term health, emotional and behavioral negative effects of trauma on survivors.

Seventh-day Adventist pastors are subjected to multiple stressors in the daily routine of pastoral life. These stressors have a negative impact on the spiritual lives, relationships, health behaviors and mental health of not only pastors but their entire families. A pilot study was done of incoming seminary students in the fall semester of 2019 using an expanded ACE questionnaire. This presentation will share the results of that study and its implications for seminary students and pastors.