Event Title

A Study on Greek Conditionals: Juxtaposition of the First Class εἰ Conditional and the Third Class ἐὰν Conditional

Location

Room N310

Start Date

7-2-2020 10:00 AM

End Date

7-2-2020 10:30 AM

Description

The study of original biblical language should yield valuable exegetical implications that cannot be achieved otherwise. This research paper sought to understand the distinction that exists between First Class εἰ Conditional and Third Class ἐὰν

Conditional and the practical implication that it could have. The hypothesis is that First Class Conditional is propositional while Third Class Conditional is volitional. The paper gives a literary survey summary of how scholars have classified and understand the different conditional constructions. The methodology is done by examining two instances where both First Class Conditional and Third Class Conditional are used in the same passage: The temptation in the wilderness (Matthew 4) and the discussion on “other gospel” (Gal 1:8–9).

The paper finds that there is evidence that each conditional class emphasis different aspect. In Matthew 4, the first two temptations, written using First Class Conditional, demands a yes or no static answer; either Christ is Son of God or He is not. The third temptation, written using Third Class Conditional, is more of an invitation, and hence more dynamic; he could bow down or he could refuse. The passage in Galatians repeats the same statement but uses First Class Conditional on the first time and then Third Class Conditional on the second iteration. This creates a reiteration of “if this happens,” then followed by “when this happens.”

The implication is not trivial when we consider that there are many promise-premise constructions in the NT that use “if.” Most notable is 1 John1:9. Is the focus on the certainty of the forgiveness or on the discretion by the sinner to come and confess?

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Feb 7th, 10:00 AM Feb 7th, 10:30 AM

A Study on Greek Conditionals: Juxtaposition of the First Class εἰ Conditional and the Third Class ἐὰν Conditional

Room N310

The study of original biblical language should yield valuable exegetical implications that cannot be achieved otherwise. This research paper sought to understand the distinction that exists between First Class εἰ Conditional and Third Class ἐὰν

Conditional and the practical implication that it could have. The hypothesis is that First Class Conditional is propositional while Third Class Conditional is volitional. The paper gives a literary survey summary of how scholars have classified and understand the different conditional constructions. The methodology is done by examining two instances where both First Class Conditional and Third Class Conditional are used in the same passage: The temptation in the wilderness (Matthew 4) and the discussion on “other gospel” (Gal 1:8–9).

The paper finds that there is evidence that each conditional class emphasis different aspect. In Matthew 4, the first two temptations, written using First Class Conditional, demands a yes or no static answer; either Christ is Son of God or He is not. The third temptation, written using Third Class Conditional, is more of an invitation, and hence more dynamic; he could bow down or he could refuse. The passage in Galatians repeats the same statement but uses First Class Conditional on the first time and then Third Class Conditional on the second iteration. This creates a reiteration of “if this happens,” then followed by “when this happens.”

The implication is not trivial when we consider that there are many promise-premise constructions in the NT that use “if.” Most notable is 1 John1:9. Is the focus on the certainty of the forgiveness or on the discretion by the sinner to come and confess?