Event Title

An Analysis of the Ongoing Debates Concerning Baptism in India: A Historical-theological Study

Location

Seminary S215

Start Date

9-2-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

9-2-2018 9:30 AM

Description

Over the past century and a half, baptism in India has resurfaced repeatedly as a major subject of contention and debate. A wide variety of theologians, both within and without India, have attempted to tackle this issue. One thread that seems to run through much of the conclusions in the published material is that the primary issues involved with baptism in India are sociological and cultural, not theological. However, several questions that theologians have asked in their studies cannot be reduced to sociological or cultural issues. These include: Can we be saved without baptism? Must we join a church after baptism? What do we do with people who choose to follow Christ but refuse baptism? In light of these, this paper will attempt to deal with the following questions: Is the issue primarily socio-cultural and not theological? Can theology and culture be separated in this fashion? This paper will attempt to address these questions from a historical-theological perspective with the goal of adding to the ongoing discussions concerning baptism in India.

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Feb 9th, 9:00 AM Feb 9th, 9:30 AM

An Analysis of the Ongoing Debates Concerning Baptism in India: A Historical-theological Study

Seminary S215

Over the past century and a half, baptism in India has resurfaced repeatedly as a major subject of contention and debate. A wide variety of theologians, both within and without India, have attempted to tackle this issue. One thread that seems to run through much of the conclusions in the published material is that the primary issues involved with baptism in India are sociological and cultural, not theological. However, several questions that theologians have asked in their studies cannot be reduced to sociological or cultural issues. These include: Can we be saved without baptism? Must we join a church after baptism? What do we do with people who choose to follow Christ but refuse baptism? In light of these, this paper will attempt to deal with the following questions: Is the issue primarily socio-cultural and not theological? Can theology and culture be separated in this fashion? This paper will attempt to address these questions from a historical-theological perspective with the goal of adding to the ongoing discussions concerning baptism in India.