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Session

School of Communication Sciences & Disorders

Event Website

https://www.andrews.edu/services/research/research_events/conferences/urs_honors_poster_symposium/index.html

Start Date

3-26-2021 2:20 PM

End Date

3-26-2021 2:40 PM

Department

Communication Sciences & Disorders

Description

This study aimed to determine whether time spent on technology impacts the developing auditory or visual memory in school-aged children. A survey was completed with the child participants to acquire a catalog of time spent on both technology devices and non-technological activities. Tests included a visual and auditory memory assessment adapted from the Preschool Language Scales Fifth Edition (PLS-5). The subtests were expanded upon in order to incorporate an auditory element. The results indicated that there was no significance between time spent on technology and visual and auditory memory scores. This was likely caused by the small sample size. However, the researchers did find that the auditory mean scores were significantly different from the visual mean scores across the participant’s age range. Consequently, the researchers believe that this area of research could benefit from a similar study with a larger sample size, for specifically the technology element, that continues to assess how auditory and visual memory compare across this age range.

Acknowledgments

Advisor: D'Jaris Coles-White

cameron-mayer.pdf (909 kB)
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Mar 26th, 2:20 PM Mar 26th, 2:40 PM

The Impact of Technology on the Developing Visual and/or Auditory Memory in School Aged Children

This study aimed to determine whether time spent on technology impacts the developing auditory or visual memory in school-aged children. A survey was completed with the child participants to acquire a catalog of time spent on both technology devices and non-technological activities. Tests included a visual and auditory memory assessment adapted from the Preschool Language Scales Fifth Edition (PLS-5). The subtests were expanded upon in order to incorporate an auditory element. The results indicated that there was no significance between time spent on technology and visual and auditory memory scores. This was likely caused by the small sample size. However, the researchers did find that the auditory mean scores were significantly different from the visual mean scores across the participant’s age range. Consequently, the researchers believe that this area of research could benefit from a similar study with a larger sample size, for specifically the technology element, that continues to assess how auditory and visual memory compare across this age range.

https://digitalcommons.andrews.edu/honors-undergraduate-poster-symposium/2021/symposium/33