Event Title

P-01 Lectin Properties of Synthetically Produced Glucuronate, Alginate, and Related Boronates

Presenter Information

Vanessa Angel

Start Date

2-28-2020 2:30 PM

Description

In the nineteenth century, researchers discovered the ability of some proteins to agglutinate red blood cells (Goldstein, 1980). The proteins were found mainly in the seeds of leguminous plants and were named phytohemagglutinins, or hemagglutinins. Particular hemagglutinins were able to agglutinate red blood cells (RBCs) of a particular blood type. Lectins are proteinaceous macromolecules of nonimmune origin, capable of interacting with carbohydrates to form complexes (Goldstein, 1980). Lectins derive mainly from leguminous plants, animals, fruiting bodies of fungi, and bacteria. This research focuses on identifying the lectin characteristics of synthetic compounds through agglutination of red blood cells of known blood group and type. Lectins continue to be the focus of research due to their potential diverse applications, specifically for blood grouping, mitogenic activity, and even stem cell transplantation.

Acknowledgments

J.N. Andrews Honors Scholar

Mentor:

Karen Reiner, Medical Laboratory Sciences

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Feb 28th, 2:30 PM

P-01 Lectin Properties of Synthetically Produced Glucuronate, Alginate, and Related Boronates

In the nineteenth century, researchers discovered the ability of some proteins to agglutinate red blood cells (Goldstein, 1980). The proteins were found mainly in the seeds of leguminous plants and were named phytohemagglutinins, or hemagglutinins. Particular hemagglutinins were able to agglutinate red blood cells (RBCs) of a particular blood type. Lectins are proteinaceous macromolecules of nonimmune origin, capable of interacting with carbohydrates to form complexes (Goldstein, 1980). Lectins derive mainly from leguminous plants, animals, fruiting bodies of fungi, and bacteria. This research focuses on identifying the lectin characteristics of synthetic compounds through agglutination of red blood cells of known blood group and type. Lectins continue to be the focus of research due to their potential diverse applications, specifically for blood grouping, mitogenic activity, and even stem cell transplantation.