Event Title

P-37 A Comparative Analysis of the Incidence in Voice Disorders among Black and Non-Black Seventh-day Adventist Preachers

Start Date

3-2-2018 2:30 PM

Description

Preachers of all cultural backgrounds are considered occupational voice users. Research demonstrates that all preachers are at risk of developing voice disorders; however, it’s unknown if voice disorders are more prevalent in the Black community. Black preaching is characterized by longer average sermons, a melodic intensifying voice, and the need for enhanced projection over a more participatory congregation. The purpose of this study was to determine if cultural preaching styles influence the prevalence of voice disorders among preachers. Participants in the study completed eligibility questions, the Glottal Function Index, and an acoustic protocol using the Sona Match Computerized Speech Lab.

Acknowledgments

Tammy Shilling, M.A., CCC-SLP.

Andrews University Office of Research & Creative Scholarship.

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Mar 2nd, 2:30 PM

P-37 A Comparative Analysis of the Incidence in Voice Disorders among Black and Non-Black Seventh-day Adventist Preachers

Preachers of all cultural backgrounds are considered occupational voice users. Research demonstrates that all preachers are at risk of developing voice disorders; however, it’s unknown if voice disorders are more prevalent in the Black community. Black preaching is characterized by longer average sermons, a melodic intensifying voice, and the need for enhanced projection over a more participatory congregation. The purpose of this study was to determine if cultural preaching styles influence the prevalence of voice disorders among preachers. Participants in the study completed eligibility questions, the Glottal Function Index, and an acoustic protocol using the Sona Match Computerized Speech Lab.