Event Title

P-12 In the House of God: Divine Authority and the Collectivity of Spiritual Experience in George Herbert’s The Temple and Ralph Vaughan Williams’ Five Mystical Songs

Start Date

3-2-2018 2:30 PM

Description

George Herbert’s poem collection, The Temple (1633), portrays a reciprocal relationship between the human and divine, suggesting that we are to house the glory of God and abide in Him. In “Love (III)” from The Temple, Herbert illustrates this, showing that just as God dwells in our hearts, we receive sustenance from Him. “Love bade me welcome” from Ralph Vaughan Williams’ Five Mystical Songs (1911), places “Love (III)” in conversation with a musical score. Interdisciplinary analysis of Herbert’s poem and RVW's song demonstrates how the musical composition enlarges Herbert’s dyadic approach, evoking the individual’s participation in a wider holy community.

Acknowledgments

Dr. L. Monique Pittman.

J. N. Andrews Honors Program.

AU Office of Research & Creative Scholarship.

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Mar 2nd, 2:30 PM

P-12 In the House of God: Divine Authority and the Collectivity of Spiritual Experience in George Herbert’s The Temple and Ralph Vaughan Williams’ Five Mystical Songs

George Herbert’s poem collection, The Temple (1633), portrays a reciprocal relationship between the human and divine, suggesting that we are to house the glory of God and abide in Him. In “Love (III)” from The Temple, Herbert illustrates this, showing that just as God dwells in our hearts, we receive sustenance from Him. “Love bade me welcome” from Ralph Vaughan Williams’ Five Mystical Songs (1911), places “Love (III)” in conversation with a musical score. Interdisciplinary analysis of Herbert’s poem and RVW's song demonstrates how the musical composition enlarges Herbert’s dyadic approach, evoking the individual’s participation in a wider holy community.