Event Title

Jordanian Community Development through Hisban Cultural Heritage Project

Presenter Information

Anna Kim, Andrews University

Start Date

3-3-2017 2:30 PM

End Date

3-3-2017 4:00 PM

Description

How might hands-on learning about roof-top gardening impact K-12 students’ sense of ownership of their past, present and future? This research will contribute to further understanding of ways that K-12 education in the Middle East can improve local community activism when it comes to caring for past, present and future their local cultural and environmental heritage. In addition to reviewing previous research on this topic, this study will report lessons learned through this researcher’s personal involvement with developing a curriculum and hands-on learning opportunities for teaching about roof-top gardens in two local public schools in Hisban, Jordan. The project was carried out during a three month period during the summer of 2016 in partnership with two local schools, the Hisban Cultural Association, the Hisban Womens’s Association and the Andrews University sponsored Hisban Cultural Heritage Project. Standard ethnographic procedures were used to carry out this study, including face-to-face informal and formal interviewing, direct participant observation, and recording of field notes. I hypothesized that hands-on learning about roof-top gardening will have a positive impact on K-12 students’ sense of ownership of their past, present and future.

Acknowledgments

Dr. Oystein LaBianca

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Mar 3rd, 2:30 PM Mar 3rd, 4:00 PM

Jordanian Community Development through Hisban Cultural Heritage Project

How might hands-on learning about roof-top gardening impact K-12 students’ sense of ownership of their past, present and future? This research will contribute to further understanding of ways that K-12 education in the Middle East can improve local community activism when it comes to caring for past, present and future their local cultural and environmental heritage. In addition to reviewing previous research on this topic, this study will report lessons learned through this researcher’s personal involvement with developing a curriculum and hands-on learning opportunities for teaching about roof-top gardens in two local public schools in Hisban, Jordan. The project was carried out during a three month period during the summer of 2016 in partnership with two local schools, the Hisban Cultural Association, the Hisban Womens’s Association and the Andrews University sponsored Hisban Cultural Heritage Project. Standard ethnographic procedures were used to carry out this study, including face-to-face informal and formal interviewing, direct participant observation, and recording of field notes. I hypothesized that hands-on learning about roof-top gardening will have a positive impact on K-12 students’ sense of ownership of their past, present and future.