Event Title

Interferometry-Based Gravitational Wave Detection

Start Date

3-3-2017 2:30 PM

End Date

3-3-2017 4:00 PM

Description

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) consists of two detectors, one in Hanford, Washington and the other in Livingston, Louisiana. Gravitational waves are “ripples” in the fabric of spacetime. The most powerful gravitational waves are generated by the most cataclysmic events in the universe, such as the merger of two black holes, detected by LIGO in September of 2015. With the construction of more detectors in the future, such as the planned LIGO detector located in India, we will better be able to determine the sky locations of gravitational wave sources and distinguish gravitational wave signals from local noise sources.

Acknowledgments

Dr. Tiffany Summerscales

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Mar 3rd, 2:30 PM Mar 3rd, 4:00 PM

Interferometry-Based Gravitational Wave Detection

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) consists of two detectors, one in Hanford, Washington and the other in Livingston, Louisiana. Gravitational waves are “ripples” in the fabric of spacetime. The most powerful gravitational waves are generated by the most cataclysmic events in the universe, such as the merger of two black holes, detected by LIGO in September of 2015. With the construction of more detectors in the future, such as the planned LIGO detector located in India, we will better be able to determine the sky locations of gravitational wave sources and distinguish gravitational wave signals from local noise sources.