Event Title

Using Sea Surface Temperature to Predict the Odds of Egg Cannibalism in a Seabird Colony

Location

Buller Hall

Start Date

2-26-2016 2:30 PM

End Date

2-26-2016 4:00 PM

Description

Sea surface temperature (SST) is a primary predictor of egg cannibalism in a large gull colony on Protection Island, Washington. In particular, a 0.1 degree increase in average SST during September-May prior to egg laying increases the odds that an egg is cannibalized by 10% if all other factors are kept constant. This study seeks to answer two main questions: (1) Is September-May the best time interval over which to average SST in order to predict cannibalism? (2) Do any other time intervals (for example, January-April) that are more computationally convenient for field biologists work as well as September-May?

Acknowledgments

Dr. James Hayward & Dr. Shandelle Henson

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Feb 26th, 2:30 PM Feb 26th, 4:00 PM

Using Sea Surface Temperature to Predict the Odds of Egg Cannibalism in a Seabird Colony

Buller Hall

Sea surface temperature (SST) is a primary predictor of egg cannibalism in a large gull colony on Protection Island, Washington. In particular, a 0.1 degree increase in average SST during September-May prior to egg laying increases the odds that an egg is cannibalized by 10% if all other factors are kept constant. This study seeks to answer two main questions: (1) Is September-May the best time interval over which to average SST in order to predict cannibalism? (2) Do any other time intervals (for example, January-April) that are more computationally convenient for field biologists work as well as September-May?