Date of Award

2004

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

College

College of Education and International Services

Program

Higher Education Administration PhD

First Advisor

Hinsdale Bernard

Second Advisor

Lyndon G. Furst

Third Advisor

Norman K. Miles

Abstract

Problem

The purpose of this study was to identify the level of board effectiveness in selected private and public universities in Zimbabwe as perceived by board members. Also, the study sought to determine the influence of such demographic variables as age, education level, and years of service on the seven factors of university functioning: institutional mission, institutional planning, physical plant, financial management, board membership, board organization and performance, and board/vice chancellor relations.

Method

The survey method was used to collect data. Respondents were asked to complete a 47-item questionnaire and indicate their level of agreement on each of the questions (3 = yes, 2 = uncertain, and 1 = no). The sample for the study was made up of 29 university council members from each of the three selected universities giving a total of 87. Out of 87 survey forms mailed, a total of 55 respondents returned usable survey forms. The data were analyzed using mean scores and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA).

Results

The respondents at University Council A perceived the board to be effective in four of the seven areas of university functioning. There were significant differences in perception on institutional planning based on education level (p = .000). Board members with bachelor’s and master’s degrees revealed that they were better at institutional planning than those with a doctorate. Respondents at University Council B perceived the board to be effective in six of the seven areas of university functioning. Significant differences in perception on institutional planning based on education level were noted (p = .016). Those with a doctorate regarded institutional planning more highly than board members with master’s degrees.

Finally, respondents from University Council C perceived the board to be effective in six out of seven areas of university functioning. Differences in perception occurred on institutional mission based on age differences (p = .001), board membership based on age (p - .010), board organization and performance based on age (p = .007), and board organization and performance based on education level {p = .034). Newman- Keuls post hoc tests revealed that older members regarded institutional mission, board membership, and board organization and performance more highly than the younger members. Further, at University C, data reveal that those with doctorate degrees tended to be more organized and to perform better on board matters than those with master’s degrees.

Conclusions

There is a great deal of consensus in perception among university council members at the three selected universities in Zimbabwe regarding their effectiveness in accomplishing the seven areas of university functioning. However, all three university councils need to emphasize diversity in regard to board composition to include gender in the selection process. Universities in the study should develop an orientation and continuing education program in order to gain an in-depth knowledge of the institutions they serve. Fund-raising for the institutions should not be left to the CEO alone, but should also be the duty of every board member.

Subject Area

Education, Higher--Zimbabwe; College trustees--Zimbabwe

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

DOI

https://dx.doi.org/10.32597/dissertations/1702

Files over 3MB may be slow to open. For best results, right-click and select "save as..."

Share

COinS