Presentation Title

A-3 Faith, Politics, Utopia, and Deception: The Messiah Is Here.

Presenter Status

Chair, Andrews University Leadership Department

Preferred Session

Oral Session

Start Date

25-10-2019 3:00 PM

Presentation Abstract

Jesus stated that “My Kingdom is not of this world” (John 18:36). Many of his followers, however, have found it impossible to resist to the temptation of seeking to establish on this planet a “Christian kingdom” based on their religious ideologies. For centuries, many leaders have tried to enlist the power of money and politics, even the leverage of legislation or the resources of the military, to impose on the larger community their understanding of the “will of God.” They have often been looking for a “messiah” who would seize power and coerce others to comply to “authentic” Christianity. A. Romano wrote, “America is desperate for a messiah” (Newsweek, 2011). D. Trump promised in 2016 to “make America great again.” Many Christians see him as the champion who would use the Supreme Court, executive orders, and congressional legislative power, to restore America as a Christian nation. A prominent pastor stated the Donald Trump is “anointed” by God and compared him to Cyrus. Trump, in 2019, referred to himself as “the chosen one” and the “King of Israel.” Is he a cunning impostor taking advantage of gullible believers? Are the religious leaders so eager to gain political power that they are ready to compromise their integrity? Are we observing the desperate efforts of a group of believers trying to make a utopia become a reality? That stimulating conversation will force us to reflect on critical issues and, perhaps, may contribute to making us all stronger ethical leaders in our respective settings.

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Oct 25th, 3:00 PM

A-3 Faith, Politics, Utopia, and Deception: The Messiah Is Here.

Jesus stated that “My Kingdom is not of this world” (John 18:36). Many of his followers, however, have found it impossible to resist to the temptation of seeking to establish on this planet a “Christian kingdom” based on their religious ideologies. For centuries, many leaders have tried to enlist the power of money and politics, even the leverage of legislation or the resources of the military, to impose on the larger community their understanding of the “will of God.” They have often been looking for a “messiah” who would seize power and coerce others to comply to “authentic” Christianity. A. Romano wrote, “America is desperate for a messiah” (Newsweek, 2011). D. Trump promised in 2016 to “make America great again.” Many Christians see him as the champion who would use the Supreme Court, executive orders, and congressional legislative power, to restore America as a Christian nation. A prominent pastor stated the Donald Trump is “anointed” by God and compared him to Cyrus. Trump, in 2019, referred to himself as “the chosen one” and the “King of Israel.” Is he a cunning impostor taking advantage of gullible believers? Are the religious leaders so eager to gain political power that they are ready to compromise their integrity? Are we observing the desperate efforts of a group of believers trying to make a utopia become a reality? That stimulating conversation will force us to reflect on critical issues and, perhaps, may contribute to making us all stronger ethical leaders in our respective settings.