Presentation Title

P-08 Exploring the Influence of Identity and Spiritual Development on Student Teacher Responses to Challenging Social-emotional Student Behavior

Presenter Status

Assistant Professor of Curriculum & Instruction, Department of Teaching, Learning, and Curriculum

Preferred Session

Poster Session

Start Date

26-10-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

26-10-2018 3:00 PM

Presentation Abstract

Research about teacher identity development and spiritual development have individually increased in frequency and scope during the last fifteen years. However, little research has explored the way these two areas may be related to or influence each other, and more specifically to student-teacher responses to challenging student behaviors. During student teaching, many student-teachers experience significant shifts in their identity as they more tangibly grapple with the realities of fulfilling their teacher responsibilities. Managing challenging student behaviors are among one of their biggest fears. While the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (ACES) helps to account for why these behaviors exist, and subsequent studies have spurred research into best practices in responding to these challenging student behaviors, some educators have expressed concern about their role in addressing these behaviors within an academic context. There is a clear connection between personal and professional identities; teacher identity is very closely linked with teacher practice. As student-teachers within a Christian institution, the role of spirituality as a core component of overall identity development and its influence on ways they engage with student behavior provides an interesting course of study relevant to the field of education. This research project will explore the influence of identity development, inclusive of spirituality, of Andrews University 2018-2019 student-teacher responses to challenging social-emotional elementary and secondary student behavior during their student teaching semester. Case study methodology will be utilized to conduct this study. A purposeful sample will be followed throughout the students' student-teaching experience. Data will be collected and analyzed concurrently, increasing intensity as the research project continues and after data collection is completed. Triangulation, disclosure of researcher bias, and member check will ensure the validity and reliability of this study.

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Oct 26th, 2:00 PM Oct 26th, 3:00 PM

P-08 Exploring the Influence of Identity and Spiritual Development on Student Teacher Responses to Challenging Social-emotional Student Behavior

Research about teacher identity development and spiritual development have individually increased in frequency and scope during the last fifteen years. However, little research has explored the way these two areas may be related to or influence each other, and more specifically to student-teacher responses to challenging student behaviors. During student teaching, many student-teachers experience significant shifts in their identity as they more tangibly grapple with the realities of fulfilling their teacher responsibilities. Managing challenging student behaviors are among one of their biggest fears. While the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (ACES) helps to account for why these behaviors exist, and subsequent studies have spurred research into best practices in responding to these challenging student behaviors, some educators have expressed concern about their role in addressing these behaviors within an academic context. There is a clear connection between personal and professional identities; teacher identity is very closely linked with teacher practice. As student-teachers within a Christian institution, the role of spirituality as a core component of overall identity development and its influence on ways they engage with student behavior provides an interesting course of study relevant to the field of education. This research project will explore the influence of identity development, inclusive of spirituality, of Andrews University 2018-2019 student-teacher responses to challenging social-emotional elementary and secondary student behavior during their student teaching semester. Case study methodology will be utilized to conduct this study. A purposeful sample will be followed throughout the students' student-teaching experience. Data will be collected and analyzed concurrently, increasing intensity as the research project continues and after data collection is completed. Triangulation, disclosure of researcher bias, and member check will ensure the validity and reliability of this study.