Presentation Title

P-21 Identity and Experience: The Lives of Women Living with Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids

Presenter Status

Assistant Professor, Department of Social Work

Preferred Session

Poster Session

Start Date

26-10-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

26-10-2018 3:00 PM

Presentation Abstract

It is estimated that approximately 70% of women during their reproductive years are impacted by uterine fibroids (Stewart, Cookson, Gondalfo & Schluze-Rath, 2017). Uterine fibroids are growths in the uterus that may also be imbedded in the uterine lining. While these growths are not malignant, their presence may produce varied levels of discomfort. While some women experience little to no symptoms due to fibroids, women with symptomatic uterine fibroids may experience a wide range of symptoms that may impact quality of life, daily functioning and fertility (De La Cruz & Buchannan, 2017)

Several pharmacological, surgical and epidemiological studies have been conducted on uterine fibroids, additional research is needed to better understand the psychosocial and identity impacts on women living with symptomatic uterine fibroids.

This research explores identity and lived experiences of women living with fibroids by querying woman about knowledge, education, and experience of their bodies during formative years, symptomology and diagnosis of SUF, social supports, relational, emotional, and professional impacts, treatment options, and personal perceptions of their fibroid experience. Ten women recruited through two groups on Facebook utilizing purposive and snowball sampling were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. While research and analysis is still ongoing, women report significant life impacts due to fibroids. Preliminary analysis of the data indicate that anger related to symptomology and diagnosis, delay, spirituality and social supports. These preliminary themes appear to have impacts of identity for the women engaged in the study. Additional interviews and re-interview of participants will be undertaken to more deeply understand identity in this population.

Acknowledgments

Andrews University, Office of Research, Faculty Research Grant

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Oct 26th, 2:00 PM Oct 26th, 3:00 PM

P-21 Identity and Experience: The Lives of Women Living with Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids

It is estimated that approximately 70% of women during their reproductive years are impacted by uterine fibroids (Stewart, Cookson, Gondalfo & Schluze-Rath, 2017). Uterine fibroids are growths in the uterus that may also be imbedded in the uterine lining. While these growths are not malignant, their presence may produce varied levels of discomfort. While some women experience little to no symptoms due to fibroids, women with symptomatic uterine fibroids may experience a wide range of symptoms that may impact quality of life, daily functioning and fertility (De La Cruz & Buchannan, 2017)

Several pharmacological, surgical and epidemiological studies have been conducted on uterine fibroids, additional research is needed to better understand the psychosocial and identity impacts on women living with symptomatic uterine fibroids.

This research explores identity and lived experiences of women living with fibroids by querying woman about knowledge, education, and experience of their bodies during formative years, symptomology and diagnosis of SUF, social supports, relational, emotional, and professional impacts, treatment options, and personal perceptions of their fibroid experience. Ten women recruited through two groups on Facebook utilizing purposive and snowball sampling were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. While research and analysis is still ongoing, women report significant life impacts due to fibroids. Preliminary analysis of the data indicate that anger related to symptomology and diagnosis, delay, spirituality and social supports. These preliminary themes appear to have impacts of identity for the women engaged in the study. Additional interviews and re-interview of participants will be undertaken to more deeply understand identity in this population.