Presentation Title

P-16 Mathematical Modeling of ECL Reactions on the SPE

Presenter Status

Chair and Professor of Dept. of Engineering and Computer Science

Second Presenter Status

Student, Dept. of Engineering and Computer Science

Third Presenter Status

Student, Dept. of Engineering and Computer Science

Preferred Session

Poster Session

Location

Buller Hall

Start Date

3-11-2017 2:00 PM

End Date

3-11-2017 3:00 PM

Presentation Abstract

A recent NSF grant has been awarded to develop an electrochemiluminescence (ECL) based biosensor platform utilizing mobile technologies and screen-printed electrodes. Our goal is to advance the traditional ECL immunosensor instrumentation into a portable and inexpensive device. An escalating need for emergency or point-of-care diagnostics drives the biosensor to be portable, affordable, and easy to manufacture while still providing the reliability and sensitivity of high-end equipment. Significant progress has been made in developing electronic interface and methods using reagent [Ru(bpy)3]2+ with coreactants.

In this paper, we are focusing on developing mathematical modeling and design of the methods through the finite element analysis. The mathematical model describing the reaction on the electrode and diffusion of analytes and electrolytes were developed and numerically solved in the realistic geometry. Numerical simulation was performed to understand and verify the underlying mechanisms, determine kinetic parameters, and aid in the biosensor design application.

Acknowledgments

This project is funded by NSF CBET-nanobiosensing division and supported by Andrews University FRG (Kwon) and URG(Carson).

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Nov 3rd, 2:00 PM Nov 3rd, 3:00 PM

P-16 Mathematical Modeling of ECL Reactions on the SPE

Buller Hall

A recent NSF grant has been awarded to develop an electrochemiluminescence (ECL) based biosensor platform utilizing mobile technologies and screen-printed electrodes. Our goal is to advance the traditional ECL immunosensor instrumentation into a portable and inexpensive device. An escalating need for emergency or point-of-care diagnostics drives the biosensor to be portable, affordable, and easy to manufacture while still providing the reliability and sensitivity of high-end equipment. Significant progress has been made in developing electronic interface and methods using reagent [Ru(bpy)3]2+ with coreactants.

In this paper, we are focusing on developing mathematical modeling and design of the methods through the finite element analysis. The mathematical model describing the reaction on the electrode and diffusion of analytes and electrolytes were developed and numerically solved in the realistic geometry. Numerical simulation was performed to understand and verify the underlying mechanisms, determine kinetic parameters, and aid in the biosensor design application.