Presentation Title

P-10 The Effect of Music Relaxation Video on Anxiety and Biophysical Measurements in College Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Presenter Status

Professor, Department of Nursing

Second Presenter Status

Abell-Hanger Professor of Gerontological Nursing, Harris College of Nursing and Health Sciences

Third Presenter Status

Assistant Dean, Professor of Management, School of Business Administration

Preferred Session

Poster Session

Location

Buller Hall

Start Date

3-11-2017 2:00 PM

End Date

3-11-2017 3:00 PM

Presentation Abstract

College students deal with a variety of stressors such as academic, financial and social issues during their college years. Long-term mental stress puts the human body constantly in a fight-or-flight mode and at implicated risks for health complications such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease and anxiety. Anxiety is a predominant mental illness and is a major concern for students. According to the American College Health Association, students report that anxiety impacts their academic performance and scores. In hopes of decreasing this anxiety, students often turn to listening to music as a form of relief. In human culture, music plays an important role. It influences persons' physical and psychological condition directly or indirectly. Music might be combined with other techniques such as visual art to increase effectiveness in relaxation.

The study was to examine the effects of a music relaxation video (MRV) on blood pressure (BP), pulses (P), Respiration (R) and anxiety on college students. A two-group randomized controlled trial was conducted in an exercise physiology lab. Participants were randomly assigned to either in the experimental group to view a 30-minute MRV, or a control group without viewing the MRV. All baseline BP, P and R were collected prior to the beginning of the 30-minute MRV. The BP, P, R were measured every 10 minutes during the 30-minute intervention. State Anxiety Inventory (SAI) was measured before and after the 30-minute MRV. Participants in the control group received the same measurements without watching the 30-minute MRV. Results showed that SAI and pulse rate in the experimental group were significantly reduced as compared to the control group. Diastolic blood pressure indicated significant decrease for the first 20 minutes. Respiratory rate and systolic blood pressure were not significant. MRV has beneficial effects on assisting college students in reducing anxiety, pulses and diastolic blood pressure (for the first 20 minutes). The MRV is safe, inexpensive, and holds great promise to be used for college students.

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Nov 3rd, 2:00 PM Nov 3rd, 3:00 PM

P-10 The Effect of Music Relaxation Video on Anxiety and Biophysical Measurements in College Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Buller Hall

College students deal with a variety of stressors such as academic, financial and social issues during their college years. Long-term mental stress puts the human body constantly in a fight-or-flight mode and at implicated risks for health complications such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease and anxiety. Anxiety is a predominant mental illness and is a major concern for students. According to the American College Health Association, students report that anxiety impacts their academic performance and scores. In hopes of decreasing this anxiety, students often turn to listening to music as a form of relief. In human culture, music plays an important role. It influences persons' physical and psychological condition directly or indirectly. Music might be combined with other techniques such as visual art to increase effectiveness in relaxation.

The study was to examine the effects of a music relaxation video (MRV) on blood pressure (BP), pulses (P), Respiration (R) and anxiety on college students. A two-group randomized controlled trial was conducted in an exercise physiology lab. Participants were randomly assigned to either in the experimental group to view a 30-minute MRV, or a control group without viewing the MRV. All baseline BP, P and R were collected prior to the beginning of the 30-minute MRV. The BP, P, R were measured every 10 minutes during the 30-minute intervention. State Anxiety Inventory (SAI) was measured before and after the 30-minute MRV. Participants in the control group received the same measurements without watching the 30-minute MRV. Results showed that SAI and pulse rate in the experimental group were significantly reduced as compared to the control group. Diastolic blood pressure indicated significant decrease for the first 20 minutes. Respiratory rate and systolic blood pressure were not significant. MRV has beneficial effects on assisting college students in reducing anxiety, pulses and diastolic blood pressure (for the first 20 minutes). The MRV is safe, inexpensive, and holds great promise to be used for college students.