Presentation Title

The Popular Distinction between Native English Speakers and Non-Native English Speakers

Presenter Information

Joelle KimFollow

Location

Bell Hall 015

Start Date

26-3-2020 12:30 PM

Type of Presentation

25 minute Scholarly Work Presentation

Proposal for Presentation

The distinction between teachers who are native speakers (NEST) and non-native speakers (NNEST) have caused debate in the professional realm; this is especially so, therefore, within the Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages or, better known as, TESOL community. There are many assumptions that are made, regarding the “quality” of language learning that can be taught by an NEST and a NNEST, respectively, though the latter is majoritively projected in a lesser light and the former as the epitome of language acquisition. This assumption--or more simply put, prejudice--often leads to unfavorable odds of employment for NNESTs, despite their qualifications being the same, or even more than those of their NEST contemporaries. The term “native” in itself is difficult to define, both psycholinguistically and socioculturally, and--despite its ambiguity--is used as a ruler to differentiate NESTs and NNESTs (Butler 733). In this paper, I will discuss the popularly-made distinctions between NESTs and NNESTs, the “effectiveness” of both types of teachers and deliver the ultimatum--that, despite the separation made by name, there is and can be no true gap between the pedagogy of native English speaking and non-native English speaking teachers.

Acknowledgments

Butler, Yuko Goto. “How Are Nonnative-English-Speaking Teachers Perceived by Young Learners?” TESOL Quarterly, vol. 41, no. 4, 2007, pp. 731–755. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/40264404. Accessed 13 Jan. 2020.

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Mar 26th, 12:30 PM

The Popular Distinction between Native English Speakers and Non-Native English Speakers

Bell Hall 015

The distinction between teachers who are native speakers (NEST) and non-native speakers (NNEST) have caused debate in the professional realm; this is especially so, therefore, within the Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages or, better known as, TESOL community. There are many assumptions that are made, regarding the “quality” of language learning that can be taught by an NEST and a NNEST, respectively, though the latter is majoritively projected in a lesser light and the former as the epitome of language acquisition. This assumption--or more simply put, prejudice--often leads to unfavorable odds of employment for NNESTs, despite their qualifications being the same, or even more than those of their NEST contemporaries. The term “native” in itself is difficult to define, both psycholinguistically and socioculturally, and--despite its ambiguity--is used as a ruler to differentiate NESTs and NNESTs (Butler 733). In this paper, I will discuss the popularly-made distinctions between NESTs and NNESTs, the “effectiveness” of both types of teachers and deliver the ultimatum--that, despite the separation made by name, there is and can be no true gap between the pedagogy of native English speaking and non-native English speaking teachers.