Presentation Title

“A Time to Plant and a Time to Uproot”: Exploring Expectations and Experiences of Internationally Mobile Students at a Seventh-day Adventist Boarding High School

Presenter Status

PhD Student, Education

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Location

Buller Hall, Room 250

Start Date

23-5-2019 12:00 PM

Presentation Abstract

This presentation relates the findings of a qualitative research study considering the expectations and experiences of internationally mobile students (IMSs) attending a Seventh-day Adventist boarding high school in the U.S. In the relevant literature concerned with international student integration, the expectations and experiences of IMSs at the secondary level have been largely unexplored. Experiences formed and co-constructed in the context of a struggling parochial boarding school are wholly unrepresented. This study aims to fill that gap. And to fill it primarily with the voices and stories of these students faced with the fraught negotiation between the globalized imagination and local experience.

Biographical Sketch

After obtaining an MA in English from Andrews in 2014, Scott Kabel is graduating this Spring with a PhD in Education from the State University of New York at Buffalo. Academically, he is most interested in what it means to educate under the wild rubric of late modernity and globalization, wondering mainly about what is happening to culture and identity. He enjoys music, travel, summer camp, and Christian fellowship.

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May 23rd, 12:00 PM

“A Time to Plant and a Time to Uproot”: Exploring Expectations and Experiences of Internationally Mobile Students at a Seventh-day Adventist Boarding High School

Buller Hall, Room 250

This presentation relates the findings of a qualitative research study considering the expectations and experiences of internationally mobile students (IMSs) attending a Seventh-day Adventist boarding high school in the U.S. In the relevant literature concerned with international student integration, the expectations and experiences of IMSs at the secondary level have been largely unexplored. Experiences formed and co-constructed in the context of a struggling parochial boarding school are wholly unrepresented. This study aims to fill that gap. And to fill it primarily with the voices and stories of these students faced with the fraught negotiation between the globalized imagination and local experience.