Event Title

The Utilization of Serapis from 30 B.C. – A.D. 230 within Roman Elite Houses in Italy

Location

Seminary Commons

Start Date

10-2-2017 10:30 AM

End Date

10-2-2017 11:00 AM

Description

This poster presents an interpretive historical overview of the Hellenistic- Egyptian Sarapis Cult by reviewing how its origins were implemented within the political prowess of Ptolemy I Soter I (“Ptolemy”), as well as its importance within trade through the Mediterranean Sea. The poster shows how the same usage of Sarapis resulted in the Romans creating a hybrid form of the cult and intertwining it within the political prowess of the Roman Imperial Dynasties from 30 B.C. – A.D. 230; thereby, further advancing the Romanization of Serapis. The poster also notes that this process of creating hybrid cultic forms, inadvertently created hybrid forms of material culture. The examination of some material culture demonstrates how Egypt was an integral part of the development of the Roman Empire. This resulted in significant ties of the Egyptian East to Rome, showing that the Egyptian culture was as equally influential to Rome as Greece, if not more so.

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Feb 10th, 10:30 AM Feb 10th, 11:00 AM

The Utilization of Serapis from 30 B.C. – A.D. 230 within Roman Elite Houses in Italy

Seminary Commons

This poster presents an interpretive historical overview of the Hellenistic- Egyptian Sarapis Cult by reviewing how its origins were implemented within the political prowess of Ptolemy I Soter I (“Ptolemy”), as well as its importance within trade through the Mediterranean Sea. The poster shows how the same usage of Sarapis resulted in the Romans creating a hybrid form of the cult and intertwining it within the political prowess of the Roman Imperial Dynasties from 30 B.C. – A.D. 230; thereby, further advancing the Romanization of Serapis. The poster also notes that this process of creating hybrid cultic forms, inadvertently created hybrid forms of material culture. The examination of some material culture demonstrates how Egypt was an integral part of the development of the Roman Empire. This resulted in significant ties of the Egyptian East to Rome, showing that the Egyptian culture was as equally influential to Rome as Greece, if not more so.