Event Title

San Miceli: A Paleo-Christian Excavation

Location

Seminary Commons

Start Date

10-2-2017 10:30 AM

End Date

10-2-2017 11:00 AM

Description

The Institute of Archaeology at Andrews University has been excavating a Paleo- Christian site in western Sicily (Trapani Provence) at San Miceli, near the town of Salemi since 2013. The project has been uncovering a Roman village that was settled in the 3rd century BC and continued to be occupied until it was destroyed--probably by a Muslim raid--in the mid-7th century AD. Its occupation thus includes the period of the shift from paganism to Christianity. The excavations have uncovered what is arguably the first Christian basilica in Sicily that was rebuilt some three times between the 4th and 7th centuries. The remains included three phases of mosiac floors in the church along with numerous tombs, many of which indicate the relative wealth of the community, evident in the gold and silver jewelry found in the tombs. Women also seemed to play a prominent role in the church community. A large “villa” was found south of the church, also pointing to wealthy and important citizens living in the town. The poster will illustrate the work and finds of our excavations at San Miceli, 2013–2016.

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Feb 10th, 10:30 AM Feb 10th, 11:00 AM

San Miceli: A Paleo-Christian Excavation

Seminary Commons

The Institute of Archaeology at Andrews University has been excavating a Paleo- Christian site in western Sicily (Trapani Provence) at San Miceli, near the town of Salemi since 2013. The project has been uncovering a Roman village that was settled in the 3rd century BC and continued to be occupied until it was destroyed--probably by a Muslim raid--in the mid-7th century AD. Its occupation thus includes the period of the shift from paganism to Christianity. The excavations have uncovered what is arguably the first Christian basilica in Sicily that was rebuilt some three times between the 4th and 7th centuries. The remains included three phases of mosiac floors in the church along with numerous tombs, many of which indicate the relative wealth of the community, evident in the gold and silver jewelry found in the tombs. Women also seemed to play a prominent role in the church community. A large “villa” was found south of the church, also pointing to wealthy and important citizens living in the town. The poster will illustrate the work and finds of our excavations at San Miceli, 2013–2016.