Event Title

From Sarapis to Serapis: An Archaeological Analysis Depicting the Utilization of Sarapis from 30 BC–300 AD within Roman Imperial Villas in Italy

Location

Seminary Commons

Start Date

5-2-2016 10:30 AM

End Date

5-2-2016 11:00 AM

Description

Previous studies focus primarily on Greek influences in Rome. Egyptian artifacts are known as culturally exotic, but not correlated as influential by the Graeco-Egyptian Sarapis cult. This research utilizes history, architecture, and field analysis of archaeological remains within Roman Imperial Villas in Italy that exhibit basic to complex influences from the Graeco-Egyptian Sarapis cult. Nonetheless, this research seeks to present an interpretive historical overview of Sarapis, by reviewing its origination within the Egyptian Ptolemaic Dynasty and showing it as a key factor for the political prowess of Ptolemy I Soter. Then exhibiting its importance for trading through the Mediterranean Sea. Thus, introducing cultures, subcultures, regions and micro-regions and its importance for interculturization of these regions. Finally, research exhibits the re-emergence of Sarapis by Roman Emperors and its interculturation into Roman Imperial Dynasties from 30 BC - 300 AD. Further exhibiting the Romanization of Serapis. Consequently, creating hybrid cultic forms, which inadvertently created hybrid forms of archaeological remains. Focusing on archaeological remains will display Egypt as an integral aspect for the development of the Roman Empire. Thereby, affixing the Egyptian East to Rome and exhibiting it was equally as influential to Rome as Greece, if not more.

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Feb 5th, 10:30 AM Feb 5th, 11:00 AM

From Sarapis to Serapis: An Archaeological Analysis Depicting the Utilization of Sarapis from 30 BC–300 AD within Roman Imperial Villas in Italy

Seminary Commons

Previous studies focus primarily on Greek influences in Rome. Egyptian artifacts are known as culturally exotic, but not correlated as influential by the Graeco-Egyptian Sarapis cult. This research utilizes history, architecture, and field analysis of archaeological remains within Roman Imperial Villas in Italy that exhibit basic to complex influences from the Graeco-Egyptian Sarapis cult. Nonetheless, this research seeks to present an interpretive historical overview of Sarapis, by reviewing its origination within the Egyptian Ptolemaic Dynasty and showing it as a key factor for the political prowess of Ptolemy I Soter. Then exhibiting its importance for trading through the Mediterranean Sea. Thus, introducing cultures, subcultures, regions and micro-regions and its importance for interculturization of these regions. Finally, research exhibits the re-emergence of Sarapis by Roman Emperors and its interculturation into Roman Imperial Dynasties from 30 BC - 300 AD. Further exhibiting the Romanization of Serapis. Consequently, creating hybrid cultic forms, which inadvertently created hybrid forms of archaeological remains. Focusing on archaeological remains will display Egypt as an integral aspect for the development of the Roman Empire. Thereby, affixing the Egyptian East to Rome and exhibiting it was equally as influential to Rome as Greece, if not more.