Event Title

Up a Tree: Soteriological Implications of the Interwoven Quest and Rescue Plots of Luke 19:1–10

Location

Seminary Room N335

Start Date

5-2-2016 9:30 AM

End Date

5-2-2016 10:00 AM

Description

Two views dominate the interpretation of the Lukan story of Zacchaeus: either the story illustrates social rectification for a misunderstood and hated man who worked in a loathed occupation, or the story demonstrates Jesus’ ability to bring a corrupt chief tax collector to repentance and transformation. This article contends that the author’s intent was the latter interpretation and does so by exploring the narrative qualities of plot, emphasis, and characterization. We maintain that Luke 19:1–10 has two intersecting plots. One is a quest—Zacchaeus wants to see who Jesus is. The other is a rescue—the Son of Man came to seek and save the lost. The narrative tactics employed in the story place heavy emphasis on the interaction between Jesus and Zacchaeus while the tax collector is up the tree. This would seem to emphasize the quest—Zacchaeus achieved his goal. But in fact, the interaction at the tree is very much part of the rescue. We illustrate how these ideas work together to emphasize repentance and fit within the Lukan theme of rescue.

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Feb 5th, 9:30 AM Feb 5th, 10:00 AM

Up a Tree: Soteriological Implications of the Interwoven Quest and Rescue Plots of Luke 19:1–10

Seminary Room N335

Two views dominate the interpretation of the Lukan story of Zacchaeus: either the story illustrates social rectification for a misunderstood and hated man who worked in a loathed occupation, or the story demonstrates Jesus’ ability to bring a corrupt chief tax collector to repentance and transformation. This article contends that the author’s intent was the latter interpretation and does so by exploring the narrative qualities of plot, emphasis, and characterization. We maintain that Luke 19:1–10 has two intersecting plots. One is a quest—Zacchaeus wants to see who Jesus is. The other is a rescue—the Son of Man came to seek and save the lost. The narrative tactics employed in the story place heavy emphasis on the interaction between Jesus and Zacchaeus while the tax collector is up the tree. This would seem to emphasize the quest—Zacchaeus achieved his goal. But in fact, the interaction at the tree is very much part of the rescue. We illustrate how these ideas work together to emphasize repentance and fit within the Lukan theme of rescue.