Date of Award

2014

Document Type

Honors Thesis

Department

Behavioral Sciences

First Advisor

Karl Bailey

Abstract

Identifying which specific religious practices promote religious internalization is crucial in understanding the relationship between practice and well-being. The current study employs surveys along with an episodic memory recall task to examine whether the relationship between Sabbath-keeping internalization and well-being is mediated by Christian religious internalization, parental environment, and basic need satisfaction as outlined in Self-Determination Theory. Our mediation analysis results demonstrate a large mediation effect size for daily basic needs satisfaction (autonomy, competence, and autonomy) on the relationship between internalization of Sabbath-keeping and well-being. Small to medium effect sizes were found for a general measure of Christian internalization and parental environment.

Subject Area

Well-being--Religious aspects., Sabbath., Parental influences., Autonomy (Psychology)--Religious aspects.

Share

COinS