Date of Award

2003

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

School

School of Education

Program

Counseling Psychology, Ph.D.

First Advisor

Jimmy Kijai

Second Advisor

Frederick A. Kosinski, Jr.

Third Advisor

Duane McBride

Abstract

Problem. Relatively few studies have examined job satisfaction and its intrinsic and extrinsic facets for religious private universities. Andrews University seems to benefit from an identification of factors contributing to job satisfaction, and a measurement of its employees’ organizational and religious commitment. This study can clarify whether religious commitment has a potentially mediating effect on the relationship between job satisfaction and organizational commitment.

Method. As part of this quantitative research study a survey questionnaire was mailed out to all 976 Andrews University employees’ which measured levels of overall, intrinsic, and extrinsic job satisfaction as well as organizational and religious commitment. The survey included items of three instruments: the Professional Satisfaction Scale, the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire, and the Intrinsic Religious Motivation Scale. Responses were measured on a 5-point Likert-type scale. In addition, five demographic items were part of the study. Data were statistically analyzed by using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, correlational analysis, and factor analysis.

Results. This study revealed that AU employees were most satisfied with their relations with students, followed by relations with peers, and work itself. The lowest level of satisfaction was found for salary followed by organizational policy and administration and advancement. The investigation revealed that overall job satisfaction and its intrinsic and extrinsic facets were influenced by demographic variables, such as age, educational level, and occupational area. Organizational commitment was related to age and educational level. Moderate correlations were found between organizational commitment and job satisfaction. A seven-predictor model explained 44.2% of the variance of organizational commitment. Different predictor models were found for the four occupational subgroups. Religious commitment did not have a mediating effect on the relationship between job satisfaction and organizational commitment.

Conclusion. This study provided information about factors contributing to job satisfaction and dissatisfaction for Andrew University employees. Contrary to Herzberg’s assumption that job satisfaction is not influenced by demographic variables, this study has shown that demographic factors can significantly influence job satisfaction as well as organizational commitment. Religious commitment was found to be a substantial predictor of organizational commitment by itself, but did not show a significant mediating effect on the relationship between job satisfaction and organizational commitment.

Subject Area

Job satisfaction, Employee morale, Employee loyalty, Organizational commitment.

Files over 3MB may be slow to open. For best results, right-click and select "save as..."

Share

COinS