Date of Award

1994

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

School

School of Education

Program

Higher Education Administration EdD

First Advisor

Edward A. Streeter

Second Advisor

David S. Penner

Third Advisor

Jimmy Kijai

Abstract

Problem. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of pull-out programs in band and orchestra on the academic achievement of sixth-grade students in South Bend, Indiana.

Method. Two groups of 299 students each, an experimental pull-out group and a control non-pull-out group, were matched by third-grade total battery NCE scores, and were analyzed by pull-out and non-pull-out status, by race, and by gender.

A two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the hypotheses. When there was a significant interaction effect, a test of simple effects was performed. Pairwise Comparison was tested using the Student-Neuman-Keuls Multiple Comparison procedure. The level of significance was set at 0.05.

Concurrent with the empirical study, a survey was conducted among fourth, fifth, and sixth-grade basic skills teachers. The purpose of the survey was to determine the attitudes of teachers toward the instrumental pull-out program. For the survey data, item means, standard deviation, as well as percentage of response were reported.

Results. Two groups of 299 students each, an experimental pull-out group and a control non-pull-out group, were matched by third-grade total battery NCE scores. The results of this study were as follows: (1) Pull-out students had a more noticeable gain in total battery than did the non-pull-out students. (2) There was significant interaction between pull-out/non-pull-out and race for mathematics. (3) Male students had a more noticeable gain in reading than did the female students. (4) There were significant race differences for reading.

The survey revealed that teachers appreciated the band and orchestra program and saw no other way to implement the instruction except with the pull-out program. Teacher stress was also found to be a factor in theperception of the program.

Conclusion. As the results of the analysis showed, the students who are pulled out of class did not experience a significant loss in achievement and, in many cases, gained in achievement when compared to the non-pull-out students. Thus, the findings of these analyses do not support the informal contentions of the basic skills staff that the time spent out of the classroom negatively affects student achievement. In fact, the teacher survey revealed that the teachers did not feel that the student achievement was harmed by the pull-outs, and though stressed and annoyed by the pull-outs, still accepted the programs for the students.

Subject Area

Sixth grade (Education), Music--Instruction and study, Achievement tests

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