Presentation Title

P-02 Hand Dominance and Posture: A Study of Handedness Patterns in Posture Analysis

Presenter Status

Clinical Science Coordinator, Physical Therapy

Preferred Session

Poster Session

Start Date

4-11-2016 2:00 PM

End Date

4-11-2016 3:00 PM

Presentation Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to identify if hand dominance postural patterns can be identified in a standing posture assessment and if gender influences posture. METHODS: Thirty-eight subjects, 12 males (32%) and 26 females (68%) with a mean age of 26 years, participated. Standing posture of each subject was analyzed against a plumb line and posture grid in the lateral and posterior view in addition to photographic assessment. Measurements were taken for the craniocervical angle, shoulder levels, spinal alignment, pelvis and hip levels, knee alignment, and rearfoot pronation. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Frequencies were used to determine the presence of postural pattern associated with hand dominance and gender. A mix design, repeated measures ANOVA was used to determine if there was a difference in the frequencies of each postural deviation observed for hand dominance and gender. RESULTS: No one demonstrated all five postural deviations descriptive of a handedness pattern. Of the possible five postural deviations, 3% (n=1) of right-handed participants and 33% (n=2) of left-handed participants demonstrated three characteristics associated with their hand dominance pattern. There was no consistent posture pattern among the genders. A repeated measure ANOVA found that neither hand dominance nor gender was statistically significant for any of the postural variables. CONCLUSION: This study found that hand dominance and gender do not have an effect on a person’s posture.

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Nov 4th, 2:00 PM Nov 4th, 3:00 PM

P-02 Hand Dominance and Posture: A Study of Handedness Patterns in Posture Analysis

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to identify if hand dominance postural patterns can be identified in a standing posture assessment and if gender influences posture. METHODS: Thirty-eight subjects, 12 males (32%) and 26 females (68%) with a mean age of 26 years, participated. Standing posture of each subject was analyzed against a plumb line and posture grid in the lateral and posterior view in addition to photographic assessment. Measurements were taken for the craniocervical angle, shoulder levels, spinal alignment, pelvis and hip levels, knee alignment, and rearfoot pronation. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Frequencies were used to determine the presence of postural pattern associated with hand dominance and gender. A mix design, repeated measures ANOVA was used to determine if there was a difference in the frequencies of each postural deviation observed for hand dominance and gender. RESULTS: No one demonstrated all five postural deviations descriptive of a handedness pattern. Of the possible five postural deviations, 3% (n=1) of right-handed participants and 33% (n=2) of left-handed participants demonstrated three characteristics associated with their hand dominance pattern. There was no consistent posture pattern among the genders. A repeated measure ANOVA found that neither hand dominance nor gender was statistically significant for any of the postural variables. CONCLUSION: This study found that hand dominance and gender do not have an effect on a person’s posture.