Presentation Title

D-1 Soil Sand Content Influences the Weed Suppressive Effects of Mustard Seed Meal

Presenter Status

Student, Biology department

Second Presenter Status

Professor of Biology, Biology Department

Preferred Session

Oral Session

Start Date

4-11-2016 3:00 PM

End Date

4-11-2016 3:15 PM

Presentation Abstract

The use of mustard seed meal (MSM) as a biofumigant in managing weeds in agricultural settings has been well documented. However it has been suggested that soil types may differ in their ability to foster the deleterious effects of the meal on undesirable plants. Work with MSM in altering velvetleaf seedling soil growth has shown that certain soils were better suited for weed suppression than other soils. The most effective soils had elevated levels of sand in comparison to less effective soils. The hypothesis that soil sand content influences the effect of MSM on velvetleaf growth was tested by adding sand in varying amounts to a silt loam soil where velvetleaf seedlings were grown short-term. The resulting pattern of growth was consistent with the hypothesis that increased sand levels correlated with decreased weed growth. Possible mechanisms of the effect of sand on MSM effectiveness will be discussed.

Acknowledgments

Supported by a grant from the Office of Research and Creative Scholarship

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Nov 4th, 3:00 PM Nov 4th, 3:15 PM

D-1 Soil Sand Content Influences the Weed Suppressive Effects of Mustard Seed Meal

The use of mustard seed meal (MSM) as a biofumigant in managing weeds in agricultural settings has been well documented. However it has been suggested that soil types may differ in their ability to foster the deleterious effects of the meal on undesirable plants. Work with MSM in altering velvetleaf seedling soil growth has shown that certain soils were better suited for weed suppression than other soils. The most effective soils had elevated levels of sand in comparison to less effective soils. The hypothesis that soil sand content influences the effect of MSM on velvetleaf growth was tested by adding sand in varying amounts to a silt loam soil where velvetleaf seedlings were grown short-term. The resulting pattern of growth was consistent with the hypothesis that increased sand levels correlated with decreased weed growth. Possible mechanisms of the effect of sand on MSM effectiveness will be discussed.