Presentation Title

A-3 Factors Contributing to Women’s Leadership Roles in Politics: Madagascar

Presenter Status

Master's Student, Community and International Development Program

Second Presenter Status

Community and International Development Program and Department of Behavioral Sciences

Location

Buller Room 108

Start Date

31-10-2014 3:30 PM

End Date

31-10-2014 3:45 PM

Presentation Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to explore the reasons behind women’s participation in politics, focusing on the case of Madagascar. The particular focus is on leadership roles of women in politics – as heads of state, government and political parties. The research uses qualitative methods to collect data. Among others, three major reasons for women’s political participation have been found across the literature: gender quotas; kinship ties to leadership, and societal upheaval and revolution. However, upon examination of the special case of Madagascar, reasons were found that explained women’s participation and leadership in politics that were not generally found in the literature. The historical legacy of Madagascar, and women’s social and political activism were found to be the guiding forces to women’s participation in politics. The findings might have wider implications in explaining women’s access to political leadership roles.

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Oct 31st, 3:30 PM Oct 31st, 3:45 PM

A-3 Factors Contributing to Women’s Leadership Roles in Politics: Madagascar

Buller Room 108

The purpose of this paper is to explore the reasons behind women’s participation in politics, focusing on the case of Madagascar. The particular focus is on leadership roles of women in politics – as heads of state, government and political parties. The research uses qualitative methods to collect data. Among others, three major reasons for women’s political participation have been found across the literature: gender quotas; kinship ties to leadership, and societal upheaval and revolution. However, upon examination of the special case of Madagascar, reasons were found that explained women’s participation and leadership in politics that were not generally found in the literature. The historical legacy of Madagascar, and women’s social and political activism were found to be the guiding forces to women’s participation in politics. The findings might have wider implications in explaining women’s access to political leadership roles.