Presentation Title

A-1 The Seventh-day Adventist church’s response to disasters in the Indian Ocean

Presenter Status

Master's Student, Community and International Development Program

Second Presenter Status

Community and International Development Program and Department of Behavioral Sciences

Location

Buller Room 108

Start Date

31-10-2014 3:00 PM

End Date

31-10-2014 3:15 PM

Presentation Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to assess the organizational capacity of the Seventh-day Adventist church in the Indian Ocean to respond to natural emergencies and reach their local constituents, specifically in the islands of Madagascar, Mauritius, Reunion, Comoros, and Seychelles. When it comes to emergencies, churches in rural areas are in a position poised to respond – where it may take up to 72 hours for emergency aid to arrive in these remote, rural areas. These local churches with their large buildings and service- oriented populations, are ideally positioned to respond to the immediate needs of persons during emergencies by properly planning and preparing for such emergencies. We use qualitative research methods to examine the church’s current practices in relation to the specific humanitarian principles of competence, co-ordination, effectiveness, and efficiency in response to natural emergencies. We argue that this organization’s response to emergencies lacks the necessary capacity, knowledge, and experience, thereby leaving an opportunity to improve its current method. Thus, this research proposes capacity building for church leaders so that they will be better able to respond to emergencies.

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Oct 31st, 3:00 PM Oct 31st, 3:15 PM

A-1 The Seventh-day Adventist church’s response to disasters in the Indian Ocean

Buller Room 108

The purpose of this paper is to assess the organizational capacity of the Seventh-day Adventist church in the Indian Ocean to respond to natural emergencies and reach their local constituents, specifically in the islands of Madagascar, Mauritius, Reunion, Comoros, and Seychelles. When it comes to emergencies, churches in rural areas are in a position poised to respond – where it may take up to 72 hours for emergency aid to arrive in these remote, rural areas. These local churches with their large buildings and service- oriented populations, are ideally positioned to respond to the immediate needs of persons during emergencies by properly planning and preparing for such emergencies. We use qualitative research methods to examine the church’s current practices in relation to the specific humanitarian principles of competence, co-ordination, effectiveness, and efficiency in response to natural emergencies. We argue that this organization’s response to emergencies lacks the necessary capacity, knowledge, and experience, thereby leaving an opportunity to improve its current method. Thus, this research proposes capacity building for church leaders so that they will be better able to respond to emergencies.