Presentation Title

Globality: Its Implications for Research and Creative Scholarship at Andrews and Beyond

Presenter Status

Professor of Anthropology, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Institute of Archaeology

Location

Newbold Auditorium

Streaming Media

Start Date

1-11-2013 12:50 PM

End Date

1-11-2013 1:10 PM

Presentation Abstract

“The earth is the Lord’s, and the fullness thereof; the world, and they that dwell therein” (Ps 24:1). It has been said that ‘globality’ is what comes after globalization. Unlike globalization, which to a large extent has been a one-way street of the West imposing its ways on the rest, ‘globality’ is the condition where ideas and commerce flow between all parts of the globe--in other words, a world without one or more dominant centers. It is the “flat earth” foreseen by the journalist Thomas Friedman in his book by the same title. “Globality” is also a new point of view—a new perspective from which to do research and creative scholarship. For example, whereas until recently, world history was essentially European history, the perspective of “globality” now challenges historians to re-imagine how history might be written when the story to be told is that of humanity in all parts of the world. Examples of such global history writing are Maps of Time by David Christian and The Human Web by J.R and William H. McNeill. The perspective of “globality” has implications for research and creative scholarship in many other disciplines as well, several examples of which will be briefly mentioned. I will conclude the presentation by explaining how my own research as an anthropological archaeologist working in Jordan at Tall Hisban is being re-purposed and re-designed with the concept of “globality” as a point of departure.

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Nov 1st, 12:50 PM Nov 1st, 1:10 PM

Globality: Its Implications for Research and Creative Scholarship at Andrews and Beyond

Newbold Auditorium

“The earth is the Lord’s, and the fullness thereof; the world, and they that dwell therein” (Ps 24:1). It has been said that ‘globality’ is what comes after globalization. Unlike globalization, which to a large extent has been a one-way street of the West imposing its ways on the rest, ‘globality’ is the condition where ideas and commerce flow between all parts of the globe--in other words, a world without one or more dominant centers. It is the “flat earth” foreseen by the journalist Thomas Friedman in his book by the same title. “Globality” is also a new point of view—a new perspective from which to do research and creative scholarship. For example, whereas until recently, world history was essentially European history, the perspective of “globality” now challenges historians to re-imagine how history might be written when the story to be told is that of humanity in all parts of the world. Examples of such global history writing are Maps of Time by David Christian and The Human Web by J.R and William H. McNeill. The perspective of “globality” has implications for research and creative scholarship in many other disciplines as well, several examples of which will be briefly mentioned. I will conclude the presentation by explaining how my own research as an anthropological archaeologist working in Jordan at Tall Hisban is being re-purposed and re-designed with the concept of “globality” as a point of departure.