Presentation Title

P-21 Nitric Oxide interactions with Iron investigated with spectroscopy

Presenter Status

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Second Presenter Status

Department of Chemistry

Third Presenter Status

Department of Chemistry

Fourth Presenter Status

Department of Chemistry

Location

Buller Hallway

Start Date

8-11-2012 3:00 PM

End Date

8-11-2012 5:00 PM

Presentation Abstract

Nitric Oxide (NO) is an important molecule in mammalian physiology that is involved in both signaling and immune defense. However, certain pathogenic bacteria have evolved enzymes that are able to detoxify NO by reduction to nitrous oxide (N2O), thus neutralizing this important immune defense agent. Collaborators at the University of Michigan have recently developed a model complex for the active site of this enzyme. This compound binds two NO molecules, and upon two-electron reduction, transforms them into N2O. Current work is now focused on understanding the mechanism of this reaction. Towards that end, we will present a titration of this model complex with NO as followed by EPR (and IR?) spectroscopy. We will also present an assay that was developed in which a cobalt(II) porphyrin complex (CoTPP) is used to measure the quantity of NO dissolved in various organic solvents.

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Nov 8th, 3:00 PM Nov 8th, 5:00 PM

P-21 Nitric Oxide interactions with Iron investigated with spectroscopy

Buller Hallway

Nitric Oxide (NO) is an important molecule in mammalian physiology that is involved in both signaling and immune defense. However, certain pathogenic bacteria have evolved enzymes that are able to detoxify NO by reduction to nitrous oxide (N2O), thus neutralizing this important immune defense agent. Collaborators at the University of Michigan have recently developed a model complex for the active site of this enzyme. This compound binds two NO molecules, and upon two-electron reduction, transforms them into N2O. Current work is now focused on understanding the mechanism of this reaction. Towards that end, we will present a titration of this model complex with NO as followed by EPR (and IR?) spectroscopy. We will also present an assay that was developed in which a cobalt(II) porphyrin complex (CoTPP) is used to measure the quantity of NO dissolved in various organic solvents.