Presentation Title

E-2 Cooperation between the U.S. and Diaspora Communities: Implications for Development and Foreign Policy

Presenter Status

Community and International Development Program and Department of Behavioral Sciences

Second Presenter Status

MSA Student in Community and International Development

Location

Buller Room 250

Start Date

8-11-2012 5:12 PM

End Date

8-11-2012 5:24 PM

Presentation Abstract

In a partnership between the Migration Policy Institute and the United States Department of State, the International diaspora Engagement Alliance (IdEA) was launched in May 2011. IdEA is a platform for public-private partnerships designed to engage diaspora communities, the private sector, and public institutions in a collaborative process based on five pillars: diaspreneuership (entrepreneurship), Diasplomacy (diplomacy), Diasporacorps (volunteerism), Diaspora 2.0 (networking), and Diasphilanthropy (philanthropy). In this paper we evaluate the effectiveness of these pillars for the development of diaspora communities’ countries of origin and the United States by examining their applicability to diaspora communities in the U.S. Finally, we discuss and explore the implications of our findings to the American foreign policies regarding the diasporas’ country of origin.

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Nov 8th, 5:12 PM Nov 8th, 5:24 PM

E-2 Cooperation between the U.S. and Diaspora Communities: Implications for Development and Foreign Policy

Buller Room 250

In a partnership between the Migration Policy Institute and the United States Department of State, the International diaspora Engagement Alliance (IdEA) was launched in May 2011. IdEA is a platform for public-private partnerships designed to engage diaspora communities, the private sector, and public institutions in a collaborative process based on five pillars: diaspreneuership (entrepreneurship), Diasplomacy (diplomacy), Diasporacorps (volunteerism), Diaspora 2.0 (networking), and Diasphilanthropy (philanthropy). In this paper we evaluate the effectiveness of these pillars for the development of diaspora communities’ countries of origin and the United States by examining their applicability to diaspora communities in the U.S. Finally, we discuss and explore the implications of our findings to the American foreign policies regarding the diasporas’ country of origin.