Presentation Title

Exploring Implicit Bias

Location

Buller Hall 106

Start Date

30-3-2017 3:30 PM

End Date

30-3-2017 4:20 PM

Type of Presentation

50 minute Scholarly Work Presentation

Proposal for Presentation

We all have biases whether we realize it or not. It is because deep within our subconscious all of us harbor biases we consciously abhor yet the worst part of it is that we actually act upon them (Carpenter, 2008). This interactive session will help educational leaders to explore/identify their implicit biases and help develop skill to build an understanding, acceptance, and appreciation of people we interact with on a daily basis.

Acknowledgments

We all have biases whether we realize it or not. It is because deep within our subconscious all of us harbor biases we consciously abhor yet the worst part of it is that we actually act upon them (Carpenter, 2008). Implicit bias is the bias in judgment and/or behavior that results from subtle cognitive processes. It is the implicit attitude or stereotype seen often at a level beyond our conscious awareness and most importantly, without intentional control. In essence, implicit bias is about our underlying attitudes and stereotypes responsible for the beliefs and simple associations we make between an object and its evaluation that “...are automatically activated by the mere presence (actual or symbolic) of the attitude object” (Dovidio, Gaertner, Kawakami, & Hodson, 2002, p. 94; Banaji & Heiphetz, 2010). While the research on implicit bias continues to emerge, psychologists believe implicit biases are learned from several sources which include but are not limited to our environment, family, peers, teachers, culture, the society we live in, experiences we are exposed to, people we interact with, and from in print or social media (Rudman, 2004).

References

Monteith, M. J., Sherman, J. W., & Devine, P. G. (1998). Suppression as a stereotype control strategy. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 2(1), 63-82.

Rayburn, C. A. (2014). Psychotherapy with Seventh-Day Adventists.

Rudman, L. A. (2004). Social justice in our minds, homes, and society: The nature, causes, and consequences of implicit bias. Social Justice Research, 17(2), 129-142.

Vittrup, B., & Holden, G. W. (2011). Exploring the impact of educational television and parent–child discussions on children's racial attitudes. Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy, 11(1), 82-104.

Walcott, R., & Moodley, R. (2010). Counseling Across and Beyond Cultures: Exploring the Work of Clemmont E. Vontress in Clinical Practice: University of Toronto Press.

White, E. G. (1940). The desire of ages. Mountain View. Pacific Press, 19xx, 34, 19.

White, E. G. (2006). The desire of ages: Pacific Press Publishing.

White, E. G. H. (1904). Testimonies for the Church (Vol. 8): Pacific Press.

White, E. G. H. (2000). Our high calling: Review and Herald Pub Assoc.

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Mar 30th, 3:30 PM Mar 30th, 4:20 PM

Exploring Implicit Bias

Buller Hall 106

We all have biases whether we realize it or not. It is because deep within our subconscious all of us harbor biases we consciously abhor yet the worst part of it is that we actually act upon them (Carpenter, 2008). This interactive session will help educational leaders to explore/identify their implicit biases and help develop skill to build an understanding, acceptance, and appreciation of people we interact with on a daily basis.