Presentation Title

“Come with me from Lebanon”: Topographia in the Song of Solomon

Presenter Status

Research Services Specialist, Andrews University

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Session

Literature

Location

Buller Hall Room 108

Start Date

6-5-2016 9:50 AM

End Date

6-5-2016 10:10 AM

Presentation Abstract

This paper explores the unique ways in which Lebanon and the associated word frankincense (lebonah); is used in the Song of Solomon. Song 4:6-15 contains the highest concentration of the word Lebanon suggesting that it is being used as part of topographia, or the literary use of a geographical place for descriptive purposes. Yet, the usage of similar sounding words, such as lebonah or lebab (heart), in the same passages as Lebanon also places it in the category of paranomasia. Through its association with these terms, the semantic constellation is expanded, creating a triangulation between the words. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate just a few of the ways in which the author of the Song of Solomon uses geographic terms and images to enhance the evocative atmosphere of the poem.

Biographical Sketch

Sarah Burton holds an MA in Religion with an emphasis in Systematic Theology and minors in Church History and Old Testament from Andrews University. She currently serves as the Research Services Specialist at Andrews.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 6th, 9:50 AM May 6th, 10:10 AM

“Come with me from Lebanon”: Topographia in the Song of Solomon

Buller Hall Room 108

This paper explores the unique ways in which Lebanon and the associated word frankincense (lebonah); is used in the Song of Solomon. Song 4:6-15 contains the highest concentration of the word Lebanon suggesting that it is being used as part of topographia, or the literary use of a geographical place for descriptive purposes. Yet, the usage of similar sounding words, such as lebonah or lebab (heart), in the same passages as Lebanon also places it in the category of paranomasia. Through its association with these terms, the semantic constellation is expanded, creating a triangulation between the words. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate just a few of the ways in which the author of the Song of Solomon uses geographic terms and images to enhance the evocative atmosphere of the poem.