Presentation Title

Adventist World Radio (AWR) Programming as a Catalyst for Positive Behaviourial Change amongst Listeners of Adamawa and Taraba States of Nigeria

Presenter Status

Lecturer, Mass Communication Department

Second Presenter Status

Associate Lecturer, Lagos State University School of Communication

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Session

Communication

Location

Buller Hall Room 108

Start Date

5-5-2016 9:00 AM

End Date

5-5-2016 9:20 AM

Presentation Abstract

Studies have shown that radio at best can persuade and influence, it cannot solely bring about behavioural change in the listener. Supplementary approaches like face to face communication between the promoter of the idea and the audience may be required. In Adamawa and Taraba states, different levels of behavioural change had been reportedly recorded among Adventist World Radio (AWR) listeners. AWR programming has for years probably been the only medium through which the Adventist doctrine is shared with listeners in these two states. This study specifically probed into the possible relationship between AWR programmes and listeners’ behavioural change. Employing the cognitive dissonance, two-step flow and diffusion of innovation theories the study was executed through a descriptive survey design. A sample size of 1,000 listeners was selected from four local government areas (Numan and Mitchika in Adamawa state and Gassol and Yorro in Taraba state). Quantitative data were harvested using a validated structured questionnaire. Multiple regression and Pearson moment correlation were used to test the hypotheses. Results showed a significant positive relationship between AWR programming (AWR program content) and listeners’ behavioural change in Adamawa and Taraba States as depicted by p˂0.05, R2=66.5% and r=0.816. As a result of these findings, this study concluded that radio alone can exclusively bring about change in listeners’ attitude and behaviour. The programmes transmitted must have been intentionally produced, with the capacity to engender trust between the station and listeners. These programmes must consistently be accessible to listeners at regular times on a daily basis throughout the year and beyond.

Key Words: Influence, Adventist World Radio, Programming, Behavioural Change. Word Count: 250

Biographical Sketch

Dr Johnson Babafemi Akintayo has been a lecturer in the mass communication department at Babcock University since 2000. He teaches Broadcast related and Development Communication courses. He also works at the university as Director of Adventist World Radio (AWR) and campus radio Hope 89.1FM on campus since 1999 and 2006 respectively. He has a number of Journal Articles to his credit, many of them internationally published.

Dr Isiaka Babalola is an associate lecturer at the School of Communication in the Lagos State University (LASU) and also Chief lecturer at the Adeniran Ogunsanya College of Education. He has a number of journal articles to his credit especially in agricultural communication.

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May 5th, 9:00 AM May 5th, 9:20 AM

Adventist World Radio (AWR) Programming as a Catalyst for Positive Behaviourial Change amongst Listeners of Adamawa and Taraba States of Nigeria

Buller Hall Room 108

Studies have shown that radio at best can persuade and influence, it cannot solely bring about behavioural change in the listener. Supplementary approaches like face to face communication between the promoter of the idea and the audience may be required. In Adamawa and Taraba states, different levels of behavioural change had been reportedly recorded among Adventist World Radio (AWR) listeners. AWR programming has for years probably been the only medium through which the Adventist doctrine is shared with listeners in these two states. This study specifically probed into the possible relationship between AWR programmes and listeners’ behavioural change. Employing the cognitive dissonance, two-step flow and diffusion of innovation theories the study was executed through a descriptive survey design. A sample size of 1,000 listeners was selected from four local government areas (Numan and Mitchika in Adamawa state and Gassol and Yorro in Taraba state). Quantitative data were harvested using a validated structured questionnaire. Multiple regression and Pearson moment correlation were used to test the hypotheses. Results showed a significant positive relationship between AWR programming (AWR program content) and listeners’ behavioural change in Adamawa and Taraba States as depicted by p˂0.05, R2=66.5% and r=0.816. As a result of these findings, this study concluded that radio alone can exclusively bring about change in listeners’ attitude and behaviour. The programmes transmitted must have been intentionally produced, with the capacity to engender trust between the station and listeners. These programmes must consistently be accessible to listeners at regular times on a daily basis throughout the year and beyond.

Key Words: Influence, Adventist World Radio, Programming, Behavioural Change. Word Count: 250