Presentation Title

Leadership and Management: Implications For Faith-Based Medical Institutions In Global Setting

Presenter Status

Graduate Student

Session

E-2

Location

Buller Room 208

Start Date

15-5-2015 11:15 AM

End Date

15-5-2015 11:40 AM

Presentation Abstract

Historically, faith-based medical institutions have been major conduit in the provision of healthcare services in many developing countries. Research suggests a link between governance and organizational performance and sustainability. A self-administered survey was distributed among a purposeful sample (n=335) comprised of different professional occupations, including clergy, administrators, academia, and healthcare professionals, at a faith-based global healthcare conference in Geneva, Switzerland. The data were collected and analyzed using SPSS statistical software. The results show 79.5% of respondents were non-clergy and 72.3% had at least a post-graduate degree. On whether governing board of a faith-based institution should have more clergy and less of non-clergy professionals, 45% agreed or completely agreed, 41.3% disagreed or completely disagreed, and 13.7% remained neutral. There was no significant relationship between occupation and opinion on board composition. However, the negative correlation between education and opinion on board structure suggests that the more educated the individual the less likely they were to endorse increased proportion of clergy on the board, r (335) = -.12, p < .05. As best practices in governance suggest the need for professional diversity on the board, the preliminary findings suggest the need for ongoing education on the impact of governance structures on organizational sustainability.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 15th, 11:15 AM May 15th, 11:40 AM

Leadership and Management: Implications For Faith-Based Medical Institutions In Global Setting

Buller Room 208

Historically, faith-based medical institutions have been major conduit in the provision of healthcare services in many developing countries. Research suggests a link between governance and organizational performance and sustainability. A self-administered survey was distributed among a purposeful sample (n=335) comprised of different professional occupations, including clergy, administrators, academia, and healthcare professionals, at a faith-based global healthcare conference in Geneva, Switzerland. The data were collected and analyzed using SPSS statistical software. The results show 79.5% of respondents were non-clergy and 72.3% had at least a post-graduate degree. On whether governing board of a faith-based institution should have more clergy and less of non-clergy professionals, 45% agreed or completely agreed, 41.3% disagreed or completely disagreed, and 13.7% remained neutral. There was no significant relationship between occupation and opinion on board composition. However, the negative correlation between education and opinion on board structure suggests that the more educated the individual the less likely they were to endorse increased proportion of clergy on the board, r (335) = -.12, p < .05. As best practices in governance suggest the need for professional diversity on the board, the preliminary findings suggest the need for ongoing education on the impact of governance structures on organizational sustainability.