Presentation Title

The Macedonian Call: Regional, Religious, and Political Identities and the Austin School of Theology (1882-1895)

Presenter Status

Graduate Student

Session

E-1

Location

Buller Room 208

Start Date

15-5-2015 10:50 AM

End Date

15-5-2015 11:15 AM

Presentation Abstract

The trajectory of religion and morality in American higher education has been widely studied and narrated among historians of education such as Julie Reuben and George Marsden. However, neither the history of graduate theological education nor Southern higher education in the wake of the Civil War have received adequate attention in the historiography. My paper addresses this lacuna through a study of the history of the short-lived Austin School of Theology, founded by Southern apologist theologians in 1882 near the University of Texas in the state’s capital. Drawing from archival materials at the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas and the Stitt Library at the Austin Presbyterian School of Theology, I argue that historians of education must more fully address regional variances as well as the impact of the Civil War on American higher education. In so doing, I hope to challenge existent narratives of the evolving relationship between religion and American education.

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May 15th, 10:50 AM May 15th, 11:15 AM

The Macedonian Call: Regional, Religious, and Political Identities and the Austin School of Theology (1882-1895)

Buller Room 208

The trajectory of religion and morality in American higher education has been widely studied and narrated among historians of education such as Julie Reuben and George Marsden. However, neither the history of graduate theological education nor Southern higher education in the wake of the Civil War have received adequate attention in the historiography. My paper addresses this lacuna through a study of the history of the short-lived Austin School of Theology, founded by Southern apologist theologians in 1882 near the University of Texas in the state’s capital. Drawing from archival materials at the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas and the Stitt Library at the Austin Presbyterian School of Theology, I argue that historians of education must more fully address regional variances as well as the impact of the Civil War on American higher education. In so doing, I hope to challenge existent narratives of the evolving relationship between religion and American education.