Presentation Title

Religiosity & Perceived Stress Among Conservative Christian College Students

Presenter Status

Undergraduate Student

Session

B-4

Location

Buller Room 208

Start Date

14-5-2015 12:05 PM

End Date

14-5-2015 12:30 PM

Presentation Abstract

What is the relationship between religiosity and perceived stress among college students? Previous research has suggested that religiosity is a buffer against outside stressors. Our study specifically focused on two forms of religiosity internalization: identified regulation (i.e., following a faith because one wishes to) and introjected regulation (i.e., following faith due to external pressure). Additionally, we investigated how this relationship may vary by ethnicity and gender. Seventy-nine undergraduate students, in attendance at an American university affiliated with the Seventh-day Adventist Church, self-reported their perceived stress and religiosity levels as participants in a subject pool. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that identified regulation was a significant predictor of stress perception levels compared to introjected regulation. Bivariate correlations indicated Whites were significantly more distressed by introjected religiosity, and that there were no significant variations between these variables by gender. We conclude that students who have a more internalized religious belief system are more likely to exhibit lower stress levels.

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May 14th, 12:05 PM May 14th, 12:30 PM

Religiosity & Perceived Stress Among Conservative Christian College Students

Buller Room 208

What is the relationship between religiosity and perceived stress among college students? Previous research has suggested that religiosity is a buffer against outside stressors. Our study specifically focused on two forms of religiosity internalization: identified regulation (i.e., following a faith because one wishes to) and introjected regulation (i.e., following faith due to external pressure). Additionally, we investigated how this relationship may vary by ethnicity and gender. Seventy-nine undergraduate students, in attendance at an American university affiliated with the Seventh-day Adventist Church, self-reported their perceived stress and religiosity levels as participants in a subject pool. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that identified regulation was a significant predictor of stress perception levels compared to introjected regulation. Bivariate correlations indicated Whites were significantly more distressed by introjected religiosity, and that there were no significant variations between these variables by gender. We conclude that students who have a more internalized religious belief system are more likely to exhibit lower stress levels.