Presentation Title

Hot and Bothered: Climate Change, Cannibalism, and Ovulation Synchrony

Presenter Status

Faculty

Session

C-1

Location

CSH Room 108

Start Date

8-5-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

8-5-2014 2:30 PM

Presentation Abstract

El Niño events can be used to study the effects of climate change on a short timescale. We found that (1) egg cannibalism in a seabird colony increased during El Niño events, when resources are scarce, and that (2) females laid eggs synchronously in dense parts of the colony. We use mathematical models and field experiments to test the hypotheses that (1) cannibalism can be adaptive when resources are low, and that (2) ovulation synchrony can be adaptive in the presence of cannibalism, because female gulls that lay eggs synchronously reduce the chance that their eggs will be cannibalized by neighbors.

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May 8th, 2:00 PM May 8th, 2:30 PM

Hot and Bothered: Climate Change, Cannibalism, and Ovulation Synchrony

CSH Room 108

El Niño events can be used to study the effects of climate change on a short timescale. We found that (1) egg cannibalism in a seabird colony increased during El Niño events, when resources are scarce, and that (2) females laid eggs synchronously in dense parts of the colony. We use mathematical models and field experiments to test the hypotheses that (1) cannibalism can be adaptive when resources are low, and that (2) ovulation synchrony can be adaptive in the presence of cannibalism, because female gulls that lay eggs synchronously reduce the chance that their eggs will be cannibalized by neighbors.